Need Advice on outdoor water softener (1 Viewer)

Anthony Martino

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Hola!

Ah, the joys of home ownership, having more things to spend money on!

Our home is on well water and we knew going into it that the water softener was non-functioning. Our water has a light yellowish tint, tea-like in color, when you get enough of it into a basin at one time to notice it.

There is an old whirlpool water softener outside that is broken. Lowes sells these for $397. We had them do a detail to check out our setup but they said they can't install it due to coding issues, something about having to drill into the ground and it could affect our mobile home in some way (although my wife says the guy who came to the house, the contractor, said there was a permitting issue or cost that was the problem, based on the county we live in)

Anyhoozen, I had another water company try to sell me an outside water softener for over 3 grand! And just had another company come and recommend a dual chamber Watts water softener with a vortech system that would remove the Tannins in the water causing the yellowish tint, and keep them separated from other debris in the dual chamber.

Their system would include a separate tank for salt, and 200lbs of salt to start us off. Said we'd need to purchase about 150lbs of salt every three months to put into the system.

Their install cost is $1,400 for the dual-chamber system which will soften the water and deal with the Tannins. Or they can install a water softener only for $1,100 that wouldn't address the Tannins. They also would remove the old water softener.

Anyway, just looking for some input as we're brand new to this and I could use the advice.
 
It's rare that an actual water *softener* is truly needed - it does provide some benefits, but they tend to be slightly more luxurious than vital. A water filter, however, may well be in order, and since you're on well water, a biological treatment module may be in order as well.

A good filter will be enough to remove most dissolved solids, and a biological treatment module (basically a UV device) will kill whatever microbes might be present. You'll have to research whether one of those is necessary/recommended in your situation or area. As for the tannins, not sure if the filter will handle those or not. It honestly probably depends on the type of filter, as there a many to choose from based on what you are trying to remove from the water.
 
I've been through water issues. My best advice is to pony up for a comprehensive water test and install a system to treat your actual water.

I just had a new well drilled, and the needs of my new well are different from the old one. In my case, I no longer have tannin problems! Tannins suck and are definitely worth spending the money to treat. Especially if you plan on drinking this water.
 
Thanks guys. FWIW, we had the well water tested prior to purchasing the home. Came back safe (tested for Bacteria, Nitrates and Nitrites). From what I've read, Tannins aren't harmful and are actually in some things people already eat or drink anyway. We do use a Brita pitcher to filter our drinking water from the faucet.
 
Tannins aren't harmful, but I can't drink them at all. Bacteria also seems bad.

Tannins will gum up other filter media as well.

Tannins will stain your clothes, appliances and sinks/tubs/fixtures.




You have the test, just find a couple reputable filtration people and get a couple quotes for doing it right.

A Britta isn't gonna solve your problems, and the tannins are gonna have you going through filters rapidly. Britta filters are also cheap up front, but more expensive over time.
 
Florida has generally pretty awful water. High mineral and sulfur content, etc. And that's just the drinking water -- the smell of most of the recycled irrigation water will make you ill at times.

We stood it for about a year, until -- despite regular, frequent decalcification, I lost an expensive Jura/Capresso automatic espresso maker, as well as a Technivorm coffee maker, and we started to get mineral buildup in the faucets, shower heads, etc. We consulted a couple of reputable plumbing companies, and finally had a whole house Halo 5 water filtering and conditioning system installed, at a cost of almost $5K. http://www.halowater.com/

The result, three years down the line: possibly the best money I've ever spent. Good tasting drinking water, no mineral build-up ever, no foul water smell ever, and -- best of all -- absolutely maintenance free for ten years, minimum.

I'd buy the same Halo again tomorrow.

You may or may not need such a system, but the advice to get advice from the pros is sound.
 
Hmmmm, couldn't I just remove the broken water softener and then put this water filter in its place? All the hookups are there, I can't imagine it'd be anything more complicated than a swap-out:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Whirlpool-Whole-House-Filter-Whole-House-Complete-Filtration-System/1082883

The levels of iron in our water were super low, tannins are the issue, so I think this model should be alright? That should clear up the tannins and keep them from staining clothing and toilets, etc?
 
You really want to talk to someone who knows what they're doing. For me I had to inject chlorine, oxidize the tannins, and then take the chlorine back out.

This was to remove both high iron and tannins.

It was more than any single unit could handle. This kind of system would also kill the bacteria and clean the flavor.
 
Fortunately we don't have an issue with bacteria, flavor or odor. But the yellow in the water from the tannins is definetly noticeable

Just don't want to get taken for a ride, these water purification and softening sales people are always looking to sell you on something that is probably overkill. The first guy wanted over 3 grand, the new ones $1400. So at least its going down

Will keep researching
 
at some point you are at the mercy of these people. I had 3 quotes. I actually went with the more expensive option, as that guy actually was the only one who gave me the confidence that the system would work. I consider my health to be worth it. The lower two prices I got were from guys who's systems didn't seem to answer the full problems with my water.

A few of my neighbors went with the cheaper guys, and they got undrinkable water.

I'm in the middle of all of this again. I just had a new well drilled and I have different water issues.
 
Florida has generally pretty awful water. High mineral and sulfur content, etc. And that's just the drinking water -- the smell of most of the recycled irrigation water will make you ill at times.

We'll be driving around and someone will be like, "Did you fart?" and then we look around and no, someone is just watering grass.
 
Damn, threads like these and any time I'm in Arizona, California, or Nevada I really appreciate the water we have where I live. It is incredibly soft so it washes your body and your cars magnificently, thinks like water spots on cars or shower heads clogging up virtually never occur, and the taste is phenomenal. There is an artesian well that flows 24 hours a day not too far from me that you can go to at 2 o'clock in the morning and you will probably run into somebody else filling up five gallon containers to take home pure untreated water, go during the day and you usually stand in line behind five people or so. Hell, there's a town out on the peninsula where the entire city water system is untreated it's so pure.

Not trying to rub it in, it must really suck to have water like that, when I'm traveling I honestly miss the water where I live.
 
There is an artesian well that flows 24 hours a day not too far from me that you can go to at 2 o'clock in the morning and you will probably run into somebody else filling up five gallon containers to take home pure untreated water

Still wouldn't drink it without being tested. My family owns land with a sizable artesian well located on a creek. Locals do the same as you mention and attest to the purity of the water. My family looked into monetizing it so we had the water quality evaluated. Turns out there's too much poop in the water to bottle without filtration. Doh!
 
We have pretty good tasting water here in San Antonio but it is very hard water. The water is naturally filtered by the limestone in the ground and is plentiful in our Edwards Aquifer. The Limestone is only a few inches below our soil and caliche which is one of the reasons we have no basements and swimming pools cost over $60,000. We use a water softener to remove the hardness or we would be changing water heater and appliances often.

I would recommend a softener only if you are worried about the build up on appliances and water heater. The chemicals that are used for the well should do the trick. other than that you might try an RO unit for drinking water.

David
 
Still wouldn't drink it without being tested. My family owns land with a sizable artesian well located on a creek. Locals do the same as you mention and attest to the purity of the water. My family looked into monetizing it so we had the water quality evaluated. Turns out there's too much poop in the water to bottle without filtration. Doh!


I hear what you are saying but this well hasn't failed a test in its sixty plus year history, it's a very unique thing to have around. It's maintained and tested by the water district regularly and it's completely free, like I say, there are people there at two in the morning probably half the times I've gone at that time. If you go mid day you can wait thirty minutes. People come from a long way to fill containers and stand in line for ten minutes or so. The line is actually fun sometimes, it's one of those things where everybody is in a good mood and knows what to expect with regards to maybe having to wait (it's a tiny price to pay) so not very many people are impatient Maybe not like a plain full of people going to Vegas, but close. :D



http://www.kiro7.com/news/local/lynnwood-artesian-well-may-have-best-water-in-the-world/370997298
 

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