You can only save one set .....

Beakertwang

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Now, back to poker chips with you all!
 

Mattsme

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I’m taking these out with me, only because I couldn’t live with the shame if they were found in the burned remains of my house. :oops:
051E156C-AD38-481B-992D-5878021E75C9.jpeg


*Not my photo, but somewhere on my property there are two sets of these a friend gave me a few months ago. I didn’t have the heart to tell him I won’t use them...
 

Beakertwang

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Wow, beautiful Taylor @RainmanTrail! What model is it?

(The rest of the stuff is pretty cool, too, but the guitar won't get as much love here. :) )
 

RainmanTrail

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Wow, beautiful Taylor @RainmanTrail! What model is it?

(The rest of the stuff is pretty cool, too, but the guitar won't get as much love here. :) )
It's a 322ce 12-fret. It's a lot of fun to play. I like the sound & feel of the 12-fret. Although it'd be a lot more fun if I were better lol
 

Beakertwang

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It's a 322ce 12-fret. It's a lot of fun to play. I like the sound & feel of the 12-fret. Although it'd be a lot more fun if I were better lol
Nice! I had a late 90's 814CE for about 8 years. Great guitar, and sounded amazing plugged in!
 
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ovo

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I see a lot of people saying insurance will pay them out. I recall talking to my insurance agent about my collection and he said collections need extra coverage, so not sure how accurate it is to get money for your lost collection ?? But it's been awhile, so my memory might be off
 

ReallyGoodUsername

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I see a lot of people saying insurance will pay them out. I recall talking to my insurance agent about my collection and he said collections need extra coverage, so not sure how accurate it is to get money for your lost collection ?? But it's been awhile, so my memory might be off
Someone on here in the insurance business said you'd have to get an add on. Collectables are more complicated in MV so seems to make sense.
 
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markleteenie

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I believe it is extra and needs to be itemized. I think we have extra add ons for jewelry and sporting equipment (snowboarding/skiing/golf), but I hadn't thought to add collectible clay disks...)
 

Poker Zombie

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From the Trusted Choice Insurance Company:

"Homeowners insurance is designed to protect you from the loss of personal property. In theory, that should include your sports collectibles. In reality, things are not so simple. Unless your collectibles have been specifically scheduled, your insurance company may refuse to reimburse you for them.

Do not expect to get the full appraised value for them either. Reimbursements are based on your collectibles’ actual cash value, not their collectible or appraised value. That means that, if a disaster were to wipe out your collection, you would get far less than the true value back from your insurance company. In fact, you might only get back the amount you can prove with receipts that you originally paid for your collectibles instead of their current market value."

Bold added by me. Your insurance company may have different rules, but this felt generic, not specific to just their company.
 

Poker Zombie

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I feel I would be remiss without adding this note to this thread.
1573227844233.png

While it's nice to think you have time to grab something, a house fire doubles in size every 30 seconds. For scale, let's say you have a fire in a trash can. In 30 seconds its 2 trash cans in size. In the first minute, it is now 4 trash cans in size... basically a chair. 1:30 into the fire it's now a full couch in size, and by 2 minutes we are up to 2 couches. Very few people have ever held a bonfire that was as big as 2 couches, unless you've attended a large event like Burning Man. So think of the biggest bonfire you ever went to, and think of how close you could stand to the fire.

That was wood. Your couch, curtains, carpet, and electronics are made out of polyester, poly-based foam, and plastic... oil-based products. It burns much, much hotter.

But the fire isn't your problem. People rarely get killed by the fire. The smoke is the real killer. Fires generate highly poisonous gases, including carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide (created when insulation, carpets, clothing, and plastics burn). 1-3 breaths of this smoke will render you unconscious. It is cyanide.

...but wait, there's more!

Unlike your bonfire, the heat in a home cannot easily escape. The walls doors and ceiling reflect the heat back into the room. This heats up everything in the room simultaneously. In about 3 minutes, 30 seconds, the room experiences "flashover", where everything in the room reaches the ignition point at the same time. In other words, if it is in the room it will burst into flames, without direct flame contact.

A dead parent holding a dead baby, is a sad part of my job. Deaths that both could be avoided if the parent just left the child in the room (with their door closed). Let the firefighters, with their airpacks, do the work.

Of course, this is once the fire gets going. Fires usually start by smoldering. No actual flame, just the insulation on overheated wires smoldering, the pot left on the stove blackening the food, a cigarette scorching something it is in contact with. A smoke detector will alert you to the problem with plenty of time to avoid a fire.

Almost all deadly fires happen in homes with non-functioning smoke detectors. The leading cause for non-functioning detectors (other than not having smoke detectors) is dead batteries. Change your clocks, change your batteries. The batteries you remove may still be good, but we recommend 2x a year replacements. It's $8 a year, and the leading difference between life and death... and the loss of your chips. We just had a time change last weekend. Did you replace those batteries?

Do it now. It's much cheaper than an insurance rider.

Also, most smoke detectors are only good for 10 years. If you have lived in your house for 10+ years, you are probably not as protected as you think. If you are of the age/physical limitation where climbing a stool to change a battery/detector, call your local fire department. They will be happy to do it for you. I personally changed ~50 batteries last year, only 4 of them in my own house.

And yes, the storage room with my chips has a smoke detector.
 
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RainmanTrail

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I'm not sure what your laughing about, but that card seems to be worth upwards of $5000.
This one is actually worth $11,000. Anyone laughing at the idea of Mike Trout making my short list of players to grab clearly doesn't know baseball. Mike Trout is the greatest player since Willie Mays and possibly since Babe Ruth and he's still only 28 years old. If he keeps it up, he will go down as the greatest player who ever lived, full stop. I'm not even a Trout fan per se though. I'm a Griffey fan. But I'm also a numbers guy, and guys like Mike Trout come along once entry few generations at most. Some of his cards are worth $400,000+. Not joking. Pretty crazy. His name always comes up in GOAT conversations around guys like Michael Jordan, Lebron James, Wayne Gretzky, Tom Brady, Willie Mays, and Babe Ruth.
 

RainmanTrail

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I see a lot of people saying insurance will pay them out. I recall talking to my insurance agent about my collection and he said collections need extra coverage, so not sure how accurate it is to get money for your lost collection ?? But it's been awhile, so my memory might be off
I have a separate rider for my collections where I take photos of everything I want to cover and declare its value. They told me they could use sold listing and auctions from here or ebay to determine value if needed.
 

RainmanTrail

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I feel I would be remiss without adding this note to this thread.
View attachment 363872
While it's nice to think you have time to grab something, a house fire doubles in size every 30 seconds. For scale, let's say you have a fire in a trash can. in 30 seconds its 2 trash cans in size. in the first minute, it is now 4 trash cans in size... basically a chair. 1:30 into the fire it's now a full couch in size, and by 2 minutes we are up to 2 couches. Very few people have ever held a bonfire that was as big as 2 couches, unless you've attended a large event like Burning Man. So think of the biggest bonfire you ever went to, and think of how close you could stand to the fire.

That was wood. Your couch, curtains, carpet, and electronics are made out of polyester, poly-based foam, and plastic... oil-based products. It burns much, much hotter.

But the fire isn't your problem. People rarely get killed by the fire. The smoke is the real killer. Fires generate highly poisonous gases, including carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide (created when insulation, carpets, clothing, and plastics burn). 1-3 breaths of this smoke will render you unconscious. It is cyanide.

...but wait, there's more!

Unlike your bonfire, the heat in a home cannot easily escape. The walls doors and ceiling reflect the heat back into the room. This heats up everything in the room simultaneously. In about 3 minutes, 30 seconds, the room experiences "flashover", where everything in the room reaches the ignition point at the same time. In other words, if it is in the room it will burst into flames, without direct flame contact.

A dead parent holding a dead baby, is a sad part of my job. Deaths that both could be avoided if the parent just left the child in the room (with their door closed). Let the firefighters, with their airpacks, do the work.

Of course, this is once the fire gets going. Fires usually start by smoldering. No actual flame, just the insulation on overheated wires smoldering, the pot left on the stove blackening the food, a cigarette scorching something it is in contact with. A smoke detector will alert you to the problem with plenty of time to avoid a fire.

Almost all deadly fires happen in homes with non-functioning smoke detectors. The leading cause for non-functioning detectors (other than not having smoke detectors) is dead batteries. Change your clocks, change your batteries. The batteries you remove may still be good, but we recommend 2x a year replacements. It's $8 a year, and the leading difference between life and death... and the loss of your chips. We just had a time change last weekend. Did you replace those batteries?

Do it now. It's much cheaper than an insurance rider.

Also, most smoke detectors are only good for 10 years. If you have lived in your house for 10+ years, you are probably not as protected as you think. If you are of the age/physical limitation where climbing a stool to change a battery/detector, call your local fire department. They will be happy to do it for you. I personally changed ~50 batteries last year, only 4 of them in my own house.

And yes, the storage room with my chips has a smoke detector.
Thank you!
 
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