Oiling Chips Done Right

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I can't find an answer for this, but if I'm trying to put together a semi custom set, should I oil prior to, or after applying labels?
 

Trihonda

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First, the OP did a nice write up on a trusted and old-school method of oiling chips. I believe I used this exact method to oil several thousand Milanos (oh, god my thumbs still hurt). I’m not sure who explained this method to me, but there were a bunch of oiling threads back in the day on old blue and here as well. Great update though, I definitely think this method gives the best overal oil coverage by wiping the oil in.

Alright, time for the stupid question of the day. If you just busted your chips out and started playing with them, would the natural oils from peoples skin eventually accomplish the same thing? Granted, it would probably take way longer.
My guess is this method is slightly better than most (for coverage), However, I highly doubt it alone specifically keeps the chips looking oiled. The OP mentions several times that his chips are used regularly, which I’m sure helps to keep them looking oiled. The advantage to oiling first, using a pure mineral oil, is that the pores of the chips are filled with a more stable/pure oil, as opposed to skin oils. Just my guess. I’ll take mineral oil over bacon/burger oil as my chips’ base layer. Lol.

I still prefer my oil/water oiling trick, as it coats the chips pretty well, and still allows them to dry and absorb the mineral oil. And my personal opinion, I don’t think “hard rubbing” oil onto each individual chip produces a final result worth the extra time and joint arthritis. I can oil well over 1000 chips an hour, and they are close to 90-95% as well oiled.

But as I already stated, the OP is probably correct that this is a more complete method than others. If you’re looking to do it right, the OPs writeup is a solid resource :)
 
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First, the OP did a nice write up on a trusted and old-school method of oiling chips. I believe I used this exact method to oil several thousand Milanos (oh, god my thumbs still hurt). I’m not sure who explained this method to me, but there were a bunch of oiling threads back in the day on old blue and here as well. Great update though, I definitely think this method gives the best overal oil coverage by wiping the oil in.



My guess is this method is slightly better than most (for coverage), However, I highly doubt it alone specifically keeps the chips looking oiled. The OP mentions several times that his chips are used regularly, which I’m sure helps to keep them looking oiled. The advantage to oiling first, using a pure mineral oil, is that the pores of the chips are filled with a more stable/pure oil, as opposed to skin oils. Just my guess. I’ll take mineral oil over bacon/burger oil as my chips’ base layer. Lol.

I still prefer my oil/water oiling trick, as it coats the chips pretty well, and still allows them to dry and absorb the mineral oil. And my personal opinion, I don’t think “hard rubbing” oil onto each individual chip produces a final result worth the extra time and joint arthritis. I can oil well over 1000 chips an hour, and they are close to 90-95% as well oiled.

But as I already stated, the OP is probably correct that this is a more complete method than others. If you’re looking to do it right, the OPs writeup is a solid resource :)
What's the water method? I've finished cleaning my 1000 El dorado fracs but I'm actively avoiding oiling them all...
 

Trihonda

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What's the water method? I've finished cleaning my 1000 El dorado fracs but I'm actively avoiding oiling them all...
Here’s a thread discussing this. https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/oil-and-water-trick.11038/

Essentially, get a large bowl, fill with warm water, add a few teaspoons of mineral oil. I use a strainer inside the bowl, I toss in a few barrels of chips, mix them around for a few seconds, then raise and lower the strainer in/out of the water/oil mix a few times, before taking the chips out, plopping them onto a nearby towel. I spread out the chips, pat them a bit to dry off any of the water residue (or excess oil blobs), then place the chips on a towel to dry for a day or so.

It’s been reported one can oil 3000 chips per hour using this technique. ;)
 
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Just got done with the compression oiling:

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Now to wait 48 hours. It actually works out as I wouldn't be able to get to them tomorrow. And no, I didn't wipe so hard that the label came off in the top left. I kind of forgot to put a label on that side.
 
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I recently tried the method @Trihonda mentioned above. I don't think the results were quite as good as the compression method, but definitely not a huge difference. I was able to save a lot of time and a lot of pain!
 
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Does this oiling method lend itself to anything more than improving the look of the chips? I have some China clays that seem brittle and dry, like they are prone to chipping, and I'm wondering if oiling will help that. Or will I just end up with shinier chips?
 
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Here’s a thread discussing this. https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/oil-and-water-trick.11038/

Essentially, get a large bowl, fill with warm water, add a few teaspoons of mineral oil. I use a strainer inside the bowl, I toss in a few barrels of chips, mix them around for a few seconds, then raise and lower the strainer in/out of the water/oil mix a few times, before taking the chips out, plopping them onto a nearby towel. I spread out the chips, pat them a bit to dry off any of the water residue (or excess oil blobs), then place the chips on a towel to dry for a day or so.

It’s been reported one can oil 3000 chips per hour using this technique. ;)
Any concerns doing ASM/CPC's with this method? I have never oiled but I remember reading something a while back about ASM/CPC's.
 

Trihonda

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I’ve done some ASM chips this way, but have found that most of the ASM CPC chips I own, oiling the rollingdge suffices. Mineral oil (lightly) soaked rag, then take a barrel of chips between you thumb and forefinger, and spin the barrel in the cloth till lightly coated. Then set the stack out to dry for a day. Done. Great results. Here’s my recent CPC set with only rolling edges oiled.

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And the faces seem to look JUST fine.

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Coyote

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@Trihonda: Would you recommend the dip (bowl/strainer) method (warm water with a drop of dish liquid) for cleaning (and then wiping) CPCs on the first place?
I have done that successfully to CC samples, but inlayed CPCs are too precious for experiments.
I admit having dropped a few drops of cologne in the water as well, to fight the CC stench (again with success :LOL: :laugh:)
 

Trihonda

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@Trihonda: Would you recommend the dip (bowl/strainer) method (warm water with a drop of dish liquid) for cleaning (and then wiping) CPCs on the first place?
I have done that successfully to CC samples, but inlayed CPCs are too precious for experiments.
I admit having dropped a few drops of cologne in the water as well, to fight the CC stench (again with success :LOL: :laugh:)
I would have sworn that washing CPC chips would be no big deal, especially with a quick dunk/rinse.. but I just got done removing inlays from a rack of A-mold 312 chips this morning, with a rediculous amount of ease. Don’t get me wrong, the inlays appear attached well, but now I’m Leary of water infiltration from the edges of the inlays, which appear to only have a small dab of glue holding it in the center. If I needed to clean the chips, I’d probably do a quick dunk/rinds, but I wouldn’t soak for too long. If we are talking new CPC chips, I’ve never felt the need to clean the dust off before oiling the edges,


I’ve actually considered the possibility of soaking these ASM chips to facilitate easier inlay removal.. not sure if it’ll help whatsoever.


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Trihonda

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@Trihonda: Would you recommend the dip (bowl/strainer) method (warm water with a drop of dish liquid) for cleaning (and then wiping) CPCs on the first place?
I have done that successfully to CC samples, but inlayed CPCs are too precious for experiments.
I admit having dropped a few drops of cologne in the water as well, to fight the CC stench (again with success :LOL: :laugh:)
I can now with good faith advise against soaking CPC chips in warm water and dawn solution for any length of time. Soaked a barrel of my ASM chips for 30 mins while I cleaned my poker chairs. Upon returning I discovered mixed results.

The inlays were rediculously easy to remove. Before I had to work for 30 seconds + on each chip side. Now I can remove both inlays in 10 seconds. 1/6 time with less prying into the clay. Shows that soaking might be good for the inlay removal, but not if you care about the inlay.

But... it also shows that it caused significant drying. Might be the dawn? Oil has returned the color. But I was worried at first I’d ruined a barrel...

Here’s the results right out of the bowl...

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Here’s the color change. Scary

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Here’s the results After oiling

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Trihonda

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:eek:
Respect @Tri!
You just saved a lot of people thousands of $
And I’d also caution that some of my fading may (may not) be on the permanent side... I’ve oiled the soaked chips thoroughly and they were the same color as the other CPC chips.. But let’s see how these look once the oil has fully soaked in more. Jury is still out. That said, I’ll be trying another batch of soaked chips (minus the dawn) to see if I get easier inlay removal, without the drying/fading.
 

jrs146

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I oiled about 200 out of 1000 of my Milano’s. Probably took a few shortcuts but they look so much better. I’ll hopefully get a few hundred more done tonight during the Penguins’s game! My wife saw the mineral oil and the chips all over the place. She knew better than to ask for an explanation lol!
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BGinGA

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And I’d also caution that some of my fading may (may not) be on the permanent side... I’ve oiled the soaked chips thoroughly and they were the same color as the other CPC chips.. But let’s see how these look once the oil has fully soaked in more. Jury is still out. That said, I’ll be trying another batch of soaked chips (minus the dawn) to see if I get easier inlay removal, without the drying/fading.
Pretty sure most (all?) current versions of Dawn contain Oxi, which will definitely attack most chip dyes -- and likely none-too-good for ASM/CPC chip material, either -- especially with long soak times.

Didn't use to be that way. We have used Dawn at work for years to cleanse really oily or filthy, matted dog hair during dog baths. But it's almost impossible to find a version these days without Oxi, which we prefer to use since Oxi is an eye irritant.
 
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Does this oiling method lend itself to anything more than improving the look of the chips? I have some China clays that seem brittle and dry, like they are prone to chipping, and I'm wondering if oiling will help that. Or will I just end up with shinier chips?
There are really only 2 reasons to oil chips.

1: To improve the look/color of the chip. Make the colors "pop" most will say.

2: As a preventive method, to seal the chip and protect from the buildup/absorbing of other unwanted nastier oils/gunk ie: human sweat, food oils from potatoe chips etc.., hooker juice.

I don't believe there is any evidence that oiling will help with the structural integrity of some chips like china clays. I wouldn't generally recommend oiling CC's but many do. And I always recommend if oiling do it sparingly. A little dab will do and usually only the edges and slight wipe of the outer portion of the faces. I would never dunk or submerge chips in an oil solution but YMMV.
 
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