What distinguishes a jeton? (1 Viewer)

partybusiness

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The glossary just says "A type of token used in European casinos." but I don't know what would distinguish it from other casino chips, either in appearance or in what is used for.

I'm not very knowledgeable about this, so if there's something that would be obvious from looking at the listings described as jetons, I'm missing it.

I actually got curious from reading a book about counting boards, which referred to casting-counters or jettons. But the period of history the book covers is from 13th to 17th centuries, and the jettons it talks about were typically made of metal, not ivory or clay, etc.
 

gmunny

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Yeah that definition is a little "light" in description. The CCA glossary ( http://www.ccgtcc.com/glossary.html )

Pronounced zhe ton. A lightweight plastic gambling chip used in Europe, Asia and South American casinos. Usually moved about the table with the use of a tool called a "ratau" (rake).

Here's a pic of one in my collection. Very light weight.

51287169597_2d4de9172c.jpg


There was also a guy on PCF selling his set of Jeton's.
 

CrazyEddie

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English is a weird language; we take words from other languages and end up using them in ways that were never intended.

"Jeton" is simply a French word which means roughly the same thing we mean by the word "token", and there are related words in other European languages (such as "żeton" and "zseton") that mean roughly the same thing. So the tokens used in casinos in Europe are called "jetons" by the Europeans because that's the word used in Europe for coin-like objects such as tokens. Meanwhile, in the US, we call the tokens used in casinos "poker chips" because of the historical prominence of poker in American gambling, and even before poker was big we called them "checks" because they represented a debt owed by the casino to the player.

Now, as it turns out, again for historical reasons, the tokens used in casinos in Europe are made of acrylic and come in assorted shapes and sizes, whereas the tokens used in casinos in America are made from a clay-like material and are a uniform shape and size (mostly). In other words, the tokens used in Europe are different from the tokens used in America - although they're used in the very same way for the very same purpose. I wrote a little bit about why they evolved differently here, and the rest of that thread has some good information about jetons as well.

Once upon a time, if you took a European to an American casino and pointed to the piles of chips and asked him "What are those?" he'd answer "Jetons", meaning coin-like tokens representing monetary value used in circumstances such as within a casino. And if you as an American went to a European casino and asked one of the natives "What are those?" while pointing at the piles of acrylic doo-dads, he'd likewise answer "Jetons". And then if you brought some back and showed them to your friends, and they asked "What are those?" then you'd say "Jetons!" because that's what your friends in Monaco said they were.

In other words - originally, "jeton" just meant "casino token", but eventually, to Americans, "jeton" meant "the kind of casino token that they use in Europe" because a) they look different from the casino tokens we use in America and b) we already have a word for the casino tokens we use in America: poker chips!

There's similar examples for other words. A very old example is "beef" meaning the meat from a cow, whereas in French "boeuf" is both the meat and the animal; we borrowed the word but changed the meaning to be more specific. Something more recent is the word "gelato" which in Italian simply means "ice cream" but in English means "the kind of ice cream that they serve in Italy".

Welcome to the forum!
 

CrazyEddie

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Also, I wrote "casino tokens" above, referring to anything in a casino that represents monetary value (i.e. poker chips in the US or jetons in Europe) BUT nowadays "casino tokens" most often refers to the kind of metal tokens that you used to be able to put in slot machines, back when slot machines took tokens instead of electronic player cards! So while technically poker chips are a kind of casino token, they're not the same kind of casino token that most people think of when you say "casino token"!
 

coolguy101

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That’s also why the dealer announces “check change” when you trade in high denom chips for lesser ones. They don’t say chip change, as chips are checks, or really should be spelled cheques. Tokens are what was used in slot machines
 

BGinGA

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That’s also why the dealer announces “check change” when you trade in high denom chips for lesser ones. They don’t say chip change, as chips are checks, or really should be spelled cheques. Tokens are what was used in slot machines
Actually, only cash tokens are called 'checks', and no-value tokens are called 'chips' -- aka tournament chips, roulette chips, drink chips, but cash checks (cheques).

*Gasp* We should have been calling this place Poker Cheque Forum all along!
Nope. PCCPF.

Poker chip cheque plaque forum. :cool
 

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