Rock Tumbler - seriously! (1 Viewer)

GreekRedEye

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This is a serious question. Anyone tried putting chips in a rock tumbler or a vibratory tumbler (for removing rust/paint from metal)?

I searched the forums, but all the references I found to rock tumbling are said in jest. I am sure me just asking the question will tilt some folks. Why on earth would I consider doing this? I have an old set with worn chips and I am looking to add on and new chips are just too sharp to fit.

I do have a tumbler, but it is in storage and I will not see it for months. Wondering if someone is already foolish enough to have tried (and brave enough to admit it).
 
Not even just 1 sacrificial chip? For science?

But what would that tell you? From the POV of science, you are hypothesizing that what would happen to that one sacrificial chip would similarly happen if you did 1 barrel, 2 barrels, 1 rack at a time. It may be that you have zero control of how the wear/damage happens, and you end up virtually destroying every chip you try. Would you risk that? If you would, then please go ahead.

I would not willingly embark on this experiment, even for science.
 
Somebody asks this question every few years and we all laugh and laugh.
 
A similar experiment was done in the ‘80s, artificially aging blue jeans.

This story doesn’t have a happy end.

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Can you reverse edge condition a chip?
Basically, yeah. Just take it from super sharp to not so sharp. Take the face from textured to buttery. And how is this different from edge conditioning a chip by putting it on a lathe and reducing its diameter? Or removing an original inlay? Both are damage to get the look and feel the person wants.

But what would that tell you? From the POV of science, you are hypothesizing that what would happen to that one sacrificial chip would similarly happen if you did 1 barrel, 2 barrels, 1 rack at a time. It may be that you have zero control of how the wear/damage happens, and you end up virtually destroying every chip you try. Would you risk that? If you would, then please go ahead.

I would not willingly embark on this experiment, even for science.
Try one chip for just 30 minutes - clay plastic is pretty soft. Check, run it for longer if needed. If it completely fails, then we know. If the results look promising, try a handful. If that works, then I don't see why it wouldn't scale.
 

It would destroy the chip. You are better off using super fine grit sandpaper

Freezing Major League Baseball GIF by MLB
I actually tried that. 10 minutes and I barely got anywhere with the sandpaper. This is why I think it might hold up better in a tumbler/vibrator than we might think.

Someone here must have a tumbler and at least one sharp but orphaned/stained/broken chip. I say, just 1 chip with dry garnet or sand even for 30 minute tests. Post your results and wait for the love and accolades of your fellow PCFers to roll in!

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And how is this different from edge conditioning a chip by putting it on a lathe and reducing its diameter? Or removing an original inlay? Both are damage to get the look and feel the person wants.
This probably isn't helpful, but I agree that “edge conditioning” and removing inlays are just as bad as putting chips in a rock tumbler!
 
This probably isn't helpful, but I agree that “edge conditioning” and removing inlays are just as bad as putting chips in a rock tumbler!

Anyone who mills, edge conditions, or removes labels has no standing to object to PARTing (Prematurely Aging in a Rock Tumbler) their chips. For those who are opposed to all these practices, I respect your principles and your consistency. For me, I object to modification of chips of any real historical value. But blanks, no name hotstamps, or fantasy chips...have at it and have fun!
Season 3 Nbc GIF by The Office


But I do draw the line at this, you savages!
Now with fire!
 
As a serious answer, the rock tumbler would introduce wear to the chip that is very different than the type of wear that makes a perfectly broken in chip buttery smooth to shuffle and handle.

Shuffling a chip rounds down the sharp edges with a minimum of wear across the face (where the chips slide across). It's a pressure thing with the pressure being higher on that small edge versus the larger surface area of the chip.

A rock tumbler doesn't care and will smooth everywhere across the chip. If you leave a rock in a rock tumbler long enough, you'll start making things that are closer to marbles.


Nobody wants marble-shaped chips.
 
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