Cash Game Raising rules clarification (2 Viewers)

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41: Raises A: A raise must be at least the size of the largest previous bet or raise of the current betting round. If a player raises 50% or more of the previous bet but less than the minimum raise, he must make a full raise. The raise will be exactly the minimum raise allowed.

Does this mean that in a post flop pot, the raise amount is only required to be the initial bet, raise amount, or is it the total? Meaning, if someone bets $20 on the flop, the minimum raise is another $20 for a total of$40, can the next raise then be to $60 or does it need to be $80?
 
In your example, the raise increment is $20. So yes it would be 20, 40, 60 if making min raises.

if, however, the third person raises to $70 total the raise increment is now 30 and the next person min raise would be to $100.

hope that helps
I thought thats what it is, just wanted to confirm. Some people think that a min raise is double the total (previous bet + raise) which would me $20 then $40 then $80 then $160 etc.
 
I thought thats what it is, just wanted to confirm. Some people think that a min raise is double the total (previous bet + raise) which would me $20 then $40 then $80 then $160 etc.
What you quoted in the OP is the most common min raise rule, but in some rooms the min raise is double the previous bet. Hence the confusion.
 
41: Raises A: A raise must be at least the size of the largest previous bet or raise of the current betting round. If a player raises 50% or more of the previous bet but less than the minimum raise, he must make a full raise. The raise will be exactly the minimum raise allowed.

Does this mean that in a post flop pot, the raise amount is only required to be the initial bet, raise amount, or is it the total? Meaning, if someone bets $20 on the flop, the minimum raise is another $20 for a total of$40, can the next raise then be to $60 or does it need to be $80?
What are you quoting, i.e. source? Are you playing nl or fl? Tournament or cash? The rule you're quoting is for fl. In nl, RRoP says a gross misunderstanding of the bet allows you to take it back and correct your action. TD might say something different.
 
What are you quoting, i.e. source? Are you playing nl or fl? Tournament or cash? The rule you're quoting is for fl. In nl, RRoP says a gross misunderstanding of the bet allows you to take it back and correct your action. TD might say something different.
"Gross misunderstanding" refers to a bet the player is facing, not making. OP is not talking about anything that would be covered by the gross misunderstanding rule.
 
"Gross misunderstanding" refers to a bet the player is facing, not making. OP is not talking about anything that would be covered by the gross misunderstanding rule.
Agreed, my point was merely that there's no 50% rule in nl.
Edit: TDA might disagree with me, I've only read RRoP.
 
Agreed, my point was merely that there's no 50% rule in nl.
Edit: TDA might disagree with me, I've only read RRoP.
The quoted rule applies to NL and is covered by RRoP:

Putting a full bet plus a half-bet or more into the pot is considered to be the same as announcing a raise, and the raise must be completed.
It is often confused with the fixed-limit rule of the same colloquial name that determines whether an all-in wager reopens the betting. Also from RRoP:

In limit play, an all-in wager of less than half a bet does not reopen the betting for any player who has already acted and is in the pot for all previous bets.
 
I thought thats what it is, just wanted to confirm. Some people think that a min raise is double the total (previous bet + raise) which would me $20 then $40 then $80 then $160 etc.
The grain of truth is that this happens to be correct for the first raise of a round only. If the first bet is 20, the next raise total is to double that or 40. If the first bet is 15, the next raise is to double that or 30. So some players get it in their head that's the rule on all raises without realizing, as @DontKnowWhen correctly points out, it is the increment of the raise in the round is what matters, not the doubling.
 

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