Oiling chips (1 Viewer)

hammonje

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Not sure if anyone tried this method for oiling chips. Bought a 500 set of Outlaw clay composite chips and to no surprise they came with factory dull edges. Needed a bit of oil and I did not want to wait for game play hands to do their magic, so I decided to oil them a bit. Did not have mineral oil, so I improvised. I've done quite a bit of gunsmithing and have plenty of oils on hand. Nitrile gloves are also a benefit, because when dry they absorb a good bit of any excess oil. Decided to use boiled linseed oil and I believe the results turned out very nice. Was only wanting to give them a touch as it was all that is needed. Cut them up into piles of six or so and touched the glove to the oil, spread it around and did four stacks or so before needing more. Wiped the excess off after 5 minutes with a paper towel, rubbed in any that got past the edges on the chip face. Boiled linseed oil dries quickly and is quite volatile, meaning it evaporates and dries much faster than mineral oil. Just a touch goes a long way. Chips soaked it up quickly. They look fantastic. Took all of 30 minutes to do all 500.

Wondering if any one has tried boiled linseed oil to oil chips? Seemed pretty easy as compared to using mineral oil. Only drawback is the coloration, but don't think it effected the chip color at all.
 
Need more info.
Pure linseed? Or with additives?
With risk of discoloration and greater volatility (chips dry out faster and need more oil?), I don't see an advantage over mineral oil. Also, how is linseed easier? Would expect us the same to apply.
 
Clay composite is marketing mumbo-jumbo for injection-molded plastic. Putting any oil on plastic will not soak in, but may appear to make the surface more attractive, because it’s just scattering light. Similar to Armor-all on a plastic dashboard.
The reason mineral oil is used on true clay chips over any other oil is that it is so harmless and neutral. I would be scared to put boiled linseed on a chip not just from the fire hazard, but the solvent aspect of that oil might eat away the chip.
The Outlaw chips probably don’t need anything more than a wipe down with a soft damp cloth. There’s also the risk of any oil soaking into the edge of the label and staining it permanently.
 
@Colquhoun All true. I missed these were plastics. I'm wondering if the linseed had something else in it that created an appearance of improvement. Perhaps some sort of glaze or hard layer.
But, OP has asked if anyone else has used linseed and no one has addressed that yet. Not that there is any point on these chips.
 
Sloppy language on my part, easier due to the fact that I did not have mineral oil on hand. Oil likely just facilitated plastic dust removal. Agree, on expensive chips I would use something neutral. Was not aware these Outlaws were just plastic. Really like them nonetheless.
 
@Colquhoun All true. I missed these were plastics. I'm wondering if the linseed had something else in it that created an appearance of improvement. Perhaps some sort of glaze or hard layer.
But, OP has asked if anyone else has used linseed and no one has addressed that yet. Not that there is any point on these chips.
I believe linseed oil can darken over time so that might not be good for this application.
 
Sloppy language on my part, easier due to the fact that I did not have mineral oil on hand. Oil likely just facilitated plastic dust removal. Agree, on expensive chips I would use something neutral. Was not aware these Outlaws were just plastic. Really like them nonetheless.
The Outlaws get great reviews, and are often rated as one of the best-feeling chips in the price range.
 
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I agree, the oil probably “cleaned” the chips more than anything else. But I like the experimentation!

I know it takes way longer but I prefer my chips to get naturally oiled through handling.
 

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