Is a transparent-background label possible? (1 Viewer)

Larold

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I am going to be building a large custom set of chips, and was curious about something -

Is it possible to get a custom logo onto a poker chip with a transparent background? (Similar to the concept of a transparent background color in digital images.)

I am legally blind, so the more of a poker chip's base color is shown on the surface area, the easier of a time I have. But I would like to get a few letters or even a whole 6-letter name onto the center of each chip, ideally with the chip's base color showing behind the name (as opposed to a white / black / whatever-color background inlay).

To complicate matters, I would likely need to change the color of the printed name depending on the color of the chip itself.

Because material colors vary slight over time and from batch to batch, I don't think it would be a good idea to try to match an inlay background color to the color of the chip.

Please let me know if this is possible, and if so, how much of a pain it will be.

Thanks!
 
Have you considered going with hot stamps? They leave an impression on the chip, itself, so you’d be able to feel the difference between each one. They also only change the hot stamped area of the chip, so you get more of the base color on either side.
 
We don't have transparent media mainly because it doesn't look good as a final product on chips.
  • You can see the adhesive on the chip, lots of air gaps and glue distortion.
  • 99% of the time people want faux hot stamps, and our ink isn't metallic so it just looks bad.
My first thought goes to hot stamps as well.
I know that there are different color foils available, not just gold or silver, to help you distinguish one chip from the other.

But if you are working on a budget, (I think I saw you reference getting Apache Royals somewhere?) then color matching to the base color of the chip and printing a simple name and denomination is very doable.
Printing allows you to choose the color of that name and denomination to whatever you need that gives you the maximum amount of contrast.

The other limitation of CMYK printing is florescent colors are outside the gamut of what CMYK can reach. (Link to FAQ)
They will never be as bright as the dye in the chip.
So long as you don't choose a florescent color base chip, a very close color match should be doable.
 
Not necessarily working on a budget - I'm willing to splurge for a set that lasts a few decades. (I don't think it was I who specifically mentioned Apache - I'm willing to go with whoever has a great selection of colors, can send samples, and can provide ceramic / clay weighted chips w/o the metal insert.)

What I'm visualizing in my head is a lot of the chip's true base color showing in the middle, with a name appearing in the middle with "shiny" lettering. Sounds like various metallic colors can be selected for visibility on a given base color. If possible, I'd like to avoid best-guessing the inlay background color to match the chip color. (My eyes are very sensitive to color - it's how I adapt - and hence slight color variances are very pronounced with me.)

My eyesight loss is not total, so I don't need to differentiate chips by feel. I don't want to print the denomination.

Does hot stamping mean something creates an indent into the chip, such that the text is lower than the chip surface? Or does it mean that the text is raised, protruding out above the base surface?

Perhaps most importantly, I heave learned my sweat / oils from my fingers are more corrosive than most folks (over time) - is the ink used to print shiny lettering durable over the years, or does it rub off over time? Maybe regular light cleaning is the proper solution. :)

Thanks for the thoughts! Please keep them coming.
 
Options:
  • CPC with hotstamps
  • CPC with color-matching inlays (no metallic ink)
  • Ceramics with your logo and the rest of the face the same color as the chip (akin to a hotstamp).
I would consider spot patterns that are easy for you to differentiate. Different widths, numbers, and contrasting colors to help.
 
Does hot stamping mean something creates an indent into the chip, such that the text is lower than the chip surface? Or does it mean that the text is raised, protruding out above the base surface?
A little of both actually. The hot stamp is pressed into (sunken) the chip, which can cause a slight amount of the chip material to be smooshed up a little bit.

It sounds like hot stamping is exactly what you’re looking for to show maximum amount of the base chip surface. Like this:

78C9ABBF-2BD6-4C3B-A15F-CE7766F72457.jpeg
 
A little of both actually. The hot stamp is pressed into (sunken) the chip, which can cause a slight amount of the chip material to be smooshed up a little bit.

It sounds like hot stamping is exactly what you’re looking for to show maximum amount of the base chip surface. Like this:

View attachment 1242092
OMG!!! This. ^^ This is exactly what I was visualizing in my head re: printing in the center of the chip. The main difference being that my design will use much less text - probably just my last name in the middle in cursive.

Does hot stamping hold up over the years as the chips are handled?

Would I be able to get help over the phone from a manufacturer to help select the appropriate print color for each of my base colors?
 
Check out Hilton Spacequest Casino, they have transparent inlay and if a single drop of your sweat from hand goes in, it’ll be a permanent damage and water won’t go out.

That’s the only one used for clay + plastic transparent in Vegas that I’m aware of.

Glue, small debris got stuck between the gaps of clay and inlay, and other issues might arise. Just well as make them hot stamps if I were you.
 
OMG!!! This. ^^ This is exactly what I was visualizing in my head re: printing in the center of the chip. The main difference being that my design will use much less text - probably just my last name in the middle in cursive.

Does hot stamping hold up over the years as the chips are handled?

Would I be able to get help over the phone from a manufacturer to help select the appropriate print color for each of my base colors?
Hot stamping holds up well thru the years.
 
Why not use custom labels with the background color on the label the same as the chip color - I have seen actual color values for various chips posted here somewhere and some attached images that look very, very close
 
Why not use custom labels with the background color on the label the same as the chip color - I have seen actual color values for various chips posted here somewhere and some attached images that look very, very close
The problem, as I research, is that the actual hue/color for a given, named color varies from batch to batch. I don't think it would be possible to predict the exacrt color of the clay mixture in a given batch, and my eyes are very keen on subtle color differences. If it were possible to choose the label color AFTER the actual clay color was known, might be more prone to try it. Sounds like hotstamping is going to get me what I need though.
 
Sounds like hotstamping is going to get me what I need though.

Hot stamps are legit. If you search for 'hot stamp' in the upper right search bar, there will be a listing of posts where you can see a variety of styles and examples. Have fun!
 
CPC is remarkably good with color consistency over the years.

I have added CPC chips to an ASM order (ASM being bought by CPC, so the same equipment and techniques). There were some subtle differences in blue and lavender base chips, but they are subtle.

You might not be able to make a 100% perfect color match to the base color, but @timinater posted CMYK colors that I have used that "match" extremely well.

@timinater 's list: https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/cpc-colour-code-matching-list.52094/

and my recent set with color matching: https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/a-d-s-devils-nest-cpc-customs.78031/#post-1590572
 
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The problem, as I research, is that the actual hue/color for a given, named color varies from batch to batch. I don't think it would be possible to predict the exacrt color of the clay mixture in a given batch, and my eyes are very keen on subtle color differences. If it were possible to choose the label color AFTER the actual clay color was known, might be more prone to try it. Sounds like hotstamping is going to get me what I need though.
If you ordered al your chips in one batch the color would be consistent and form what I have read if you send @Gear one of each color he can pretty accurately match the color

But it looks like you are going the hot stamp route now anyway
 
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Is it possible? I seem to recall that I've seen pictures of transparent labels.

Ahhh...found it.

https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/10-years-back-a-very-very-asm-special.37141/post-684984

i have no idea if this is still possible.
Yea, @hippieartworks/chipshippie used to do these back in the blue wall days. Used to make transparent and holofoil labels. Way ahead of his time. Unfortunately, he's been out of the poker chip game for quite some time now and sold the printer and equipment needed to make them. He forgot who he sold it to.
 
The problem, as I research, is that the actual hue/color for a given, named color varies from batch to batch. I don't think it would be possible to predict the exacrt color of the clay mixture in a given batch, and my eyes are very keen on subtle color differences. If it were possible to choose the label color AFTER the actual clay color was known, might be more prone to try it. Sounds like hotstamping is going to get me what I need though.

If you send samples of your actual chipset to @Gear, they can work with you on color matching. Note of course that printed inks are not always going to be able to perfectly match certain colors, especially very “hot” and saturated ones.

Hotstamps with @Josh Kifer also seem like an excellent option.
 

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