Paulson color name vent thread (1 Viewer)

Frogzilla

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I’ll kick it off

1) “Light blue” is one of the darkest blues

0AFE2060-8854-4C28-8FAA-CED2712A0062.jpeg


2) “Indian blue” is much greener than “sea green” and “sea green” is much bluer than “Indian blue”

00DF287F-5BCF-4583-A773-49DD99F4A4AA.jpeg


3) “Radiant red” is straight up pink

0F58FC24-1611-4D0C-88AA-1CD05D948D82.jpeg


4) “Colon orange” is a shitty name for a shitty color
6ECCA880-E710-4BD1-A6B8-DFDBFA59D755.jpeg
 

Frogzilla

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They also misspell shebert and munzel too I believe. I may have also misspelled them.

It's 100% Munsell and not Paulson's Munzell
Sherbet is more common than Paulson's "Sherbert" but you will see sherbert occassionally
 

BGinGA

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I’ll kick it off

1) “Light blue” is one of the darkest blues

View attachment 456777

2) “Indian blue” is much greener than “sea green” and “sea green” is much bluer than “Indian blue”

View attachment 456778

3) “Radiant red” is straight up pink

View attachment 456779

4) “Colon orange” is a shitty name for a shitty color
View attachment 456780
They also misspell shebert and munzel too I believe. I may have also misspelled them.
Both of those above posts pretty much cover it for me, plus Arc Yellow should be named Arc Orange.

They could also drop Bahama Blue and nobody would ever notice.
 

Solanthos

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Both of those above posts pretty much cover it for me, plus Arc Yellow should be named Arc Orange.

They could also drop Bahama Blue and nobody would ever notice.

YES. Canary Yellow should be Arc Yellow, and Arc Yellow should be Arc Orange.
 

mike32

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Both of those above posts pretty much cover it for me, plus Arc Yellow should be named Arc Orange.

They could also drop Bahama Blue and nobody would ever notice.
As a Lions fan I think it should be Honolulu Blue!
 

BGinGA

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So who has a timeline of when all of the Paulson colors were introduced? I've never seen one beyond the last two or three group additions.
 

markleteenie

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Does Arc stand for something???
Pure speculation on my part, but I always thought it was akin to "bridging." Nearby, but not exactly. Like lightning arcing/bridging from an object to another nearby object. So near yellow, but not exactly yellow. Again - just pure BS...err...speculation on my part.
 
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BGinGA

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^^ also arc welding. Basically means bright in this context.
 

BGinGA

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Well, here's some interesting data...... seems that the yellow arc on airspeed indicator gauges is a thing.

Yellow arc—caution range. Fly within this range only in smooth air and then only with caution.

Although they look more yellow than does Arc Yellow. :confused

800px-Airspeed_Indicator.svg.png

ASI_ME.png
 

RainmanTrail

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The definitely misspell "Sherbet" as "Sherbert." This is one of my biggest pet peeves in life.

From Merriam-Webster...

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/sherbet-vs-sherbert

The word in question is from Turkish and Persian words that both trace back to the Arabic word sharba, meaning "drink." All three words—the Turkish and Persian words are şerbet and sharbat, respectively—lack an "r" in the second syllable, but when the word was imported into English in the early 17th century it was coming from languages many English speakers considered exotic, and spelling was all over the place. Among the many variations that existed in the early years, two that appeared then are still in use today: sherbet and sherbert.

'Sherbert' Isn't Wrong
By the late 18th century sherbet had become the established spelling, but after only a few intermittent uses in the 18th and 19th centuries, sherbert staged a minor comeback in the 20th century. It's now a fully established (though far lesser-used) variant.

And what exactly is sherbet/sherbert? Originally the word referred to a cold drink made with sweetened and diluted fruit juice. In the U.S. the word now most commonly refers to a frozen dessert made with milk (or cream) and flavored usually with fruit juice, with egg white or gelatin sometimes added. And to get all technical for a minute, sherbets in the U.S. must by federal regulation contain between exactly 1% and 2% butterfat. (This distinguishes sherbet from sorbet—pronounced \sor-BAY\ or sometimes \SOR-but\—which is typically dairy-free.) In British English sherbet (or sherbert) often refers to what is also called "sherbet powder": a sweet powder used to make an effervescent drink.

And that's the scoop on sherbet and sherbert. We hope this particular scoop will only make scoops of the real thing taste all that much sweeter.
 

BGinGA

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What about them spelling "fuchsia" as "fuschia"?
Ah, yes, forgot about that one. Fuschia is a popular misspelling, however.... even appears on legitimate web sites of major companies.
 

LeGold

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Ah, yes, forgot about that one. Fuschia is a popular misspelling, however.... even appears on legitimate web sites of major companies.
How does that make it any less bad? o_O
 

Shaggy

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From Merriam-Webster...

https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/sherbet-vs-sherbert

The word in question is from Turkish and Persian words that both trace back to the Arabic word sharba, meaning "drink." All three words—the Turkish and Persian words are şerbet and sharbat, respectively—lack an "r" in the second syllable, but when the word was imported into English in the early 17th century it was coming from languages many English speakers considered exotic, and spelling was all over the place. Among the many variations that existed in the early years, two that appeared then are still in use today: sherbet and sherbert.

'Sherbert' Isn't Wrong
By the late 18th century sherbet had become the established spelling, but after only a few intermittent uses in the 18th and 19th centuries, sherbert staged a minor comeback in the 20th century. It's now a fully established (though far lesser-used) variant.

And what exactly is sherbet/sherbert? Originally the word referred to a cold drink made with sweetened and diluted fruit juice. In the U.S. the word now most commonly refers to a frozen dessert made with milk (or cream) and flavored usually with fruit juice, with egg white or gelatin sometimes added. And to get all technical for a minute, sherbets in the U.S. must by federal regulation contain between exactly 1% and 2% butterfat. (This distinguishes sherbet from sorbet—pronounced \sor-BAY\ or sometimes \SOR-but\—which is typically dairy-free.) In British English sherbet (or sherbert) often refers to what is also called "sherbet powder": a sweet powder used to make an effervescent drink.

And that's the scoop on sherbet and sherbert. We hope this particular scoop will only make scoops of the real thing taste all that much sweeter.
This helps minimize my disgust for the word "sherbert." I will however contend that no major "frozen dessert" manufacturers label the product as "sherbert." So there's that.
 
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