Murdering Tropicana Evansville Step-By-Step Process (1 Viewer)

BearMetal

4 of a Kind
Supporter
Joined
May 23, 2019
Messages
5,751
Reaction score
14,165
Location
East Windsor, NJ
A few people have requested that I post the process I used for relabelling the Tropicana Evansville chips from TCR's Black Friday sale.

I do 5 chips at a time. I do one side of each chip x 5, and then I go back and do the other side of each chip. The reason that I stick to 5 is that by the time that I finish pulling the label off of the last chip, the alcohol has had time to work on the first chip

I start out by making an almost parallel slice from the middle toward the edge. Because this chip has a metal slug, there's actually no worry about harming the chip. A nice sharp blade will be able to get underneath the laminate, and sliced smoothly and easily toward the edge.

PXL_20230313_023141740.jpg


As you get toward the edge, you can attempt to angle up in hopes of pulling the edge of the label up. Sometimes this will work, and sometimes it will not. If it works then great.

PXL_20230313_023213393.jpg


However if it doesn't work, then you'll end up just ripping the label away from the edge instead of pulling it away. In either case, you're ready to grab some pliers and pull the label with consistent even pressure. The label will come off either way.


PXL_20230313_023258171.jpg


Once the label has been removed, I placed the chip back in the lineup of five, and I put a few drops of alcohol on top of it. Just enough to cover the surface.


PXL_20230313_023301993.jpg


You're now ready to move on to the next chip and repeat. Once you get through a single side of all five chips, you are ready to revisit that first chip. This is the part where you're going to use a piece of paper towel to remove the adhesive that has been dissolving with the alcohol. For five chips, one half of a paper towel is enough. I fold the paper towel into a long thin piece. The reason that I do this is because once I use the tip of the paper towel to remove the first chips adhesive, I actually ripped that tip off, and start with a clean dry piece for the next chip.

PXL_20230313_023348998.jpg


PXL_20230313_023421076.jpg


Removing the adhesive takes about 4 seconds. Hold the chip firmly onto the table with one hand, while the other hand uses karate kid style wax on/wax off circular motions. The adhesive will come right off.

You might end up with these tiny little globby things of rolled up adhesive. That's another reason that you tear off the edge of the paper towel. You will use the paper towel to just wipe them off the chip real quick, and now that that tip of the paper towel has some of the globby things on it, you just want to get rid of it.

PXL_20230313_023409556.jpg


For placing the label, you start out with a cleaned chip. After you've wiped it down in the above post, within a couple of minutes and he left over alcohol that you've left on it, especially on the rolling edges, has completely evaporated.

PXL_20230313_025841320.MP.jpg


I use this awesome Klein tools curved knife to apply the labels. You have the label stuck to just the tiny edge of the curve.

PXL_20230313_025901614.MP.jpg


Because @dickthebaker did such a fantastic job on the size of these, you can basically place the edge of the label right into the edge of the recess.

PXL_20230313_025916394.MP.jpg


Once placed there you can put your thumb on the center of the chip, as you pull the knife away and the label will just go right in place. With the label down and the knife out of the way, a circular motion or two around the label with your thumb and you're done.

PXL_20230313_025951992.PORTRAIT.jpg


And the obligatory splash pot of the final product...

PXL_20230311_042003605.PORTRAIT.jpg


I wanted to call out @TheOffalo who beat me to it and recreated the artwork for this to be possible.
 
Last edited:
Great tutorial! Thanks! I have this project on the back burner now, but plan to relabel a bunch of primaries sometime down the road.
 
Great tutorial! Thanks! I have this project on the back burner now, but plan to relabel a bunch of primaries sometime down the road.
Once you get the procedure down, it goes by really fast! Probably one of the easier murders I've done. However, you do have to still take care when removing the label not pull up any chip material. Although the center is a slug and you don't need to worry about gouges, the edges of the recess are brittle and you can lose little flea bites out of them.
 
YES!!! I would love a couple sheets of $5 labels.

@dickthebaker has all my design files for these already, and he's already color-matched with his printer to get an exact match based on the real chips. So I'd recommend getting labels from him. I do have a slightly modified "2.0" version of the design which I can provide him if you want to go ahead with getting some replacement labels.

Are you looking for primary or secondary $5s? While the labels I created are close, they're not a pixel-for-pixel perfect match. May not be readily apparent unless you hold up two chips and compare them carefully side-by-side, but just something to be aware of if you're mixing original and replacement labels, rather than replacing all labels for a particular denom (like changing all your snappers to 25¢ like @BearMetal did).
 
@dickthebaker has all my design files for these already, and he's already color-matched with his printer to get an exact match based on the real chips. So I'd recommend getting labels from him. I do have a slightly modified "2.0" version of the design which I can provide him if you want to go ahead with getting some replacement labels.

Are you looking for primary or secondary $5s? While the labels I created are close, they're not a pixel-for-pixel perfect match. May not be readily apparent unless you hold up two chips and compare them carefully side-by-side, but just something to be aware of if you're mixing original and replacement labels, rather than replacing all labels for a particular denom (like changing all your snappers to 25¢ like @BearMetal did).
I have a rack of primary $5s with quite a few that have delaminated and are sticky / stained.
 
@dickthebaker has all my design files for these already, and he's already color-matched with his printer to get an exact match based on the real chips. So I'd recommend getting labels from him. I do have a slightly modified "2.0" version of the design which I can provide him if you want to go ahead with getting some replacement labels.

Are you looking for primary or secondary $5s? While the labels I created are close, they're not a pixel-for-pixel perfect match. May not be readily apparent unless you hold up two chips and compare them carefully side-by-side, but just something to be aware of if you're mixing original and replacement labels, rather than replacing all labels for a particular denom (like changing all your snappers to 25¢ like @BearMetal did).
Can you take a picture of an original next to a replacement? I am considering replacing only chips with major delamination.
 
Can you take a picture of an original next to a replacement? I am considering replacing only chips with major delamination.
This is what I plan to do also. I think I estimated that about 30-40% of my $5s were bad enough that I would want to replace them. And about 20-25% of my $1s.
 
I spent some time improving the matching for the "2.0" version of the label design. Here it is next to an actual $5 primary chip:

1690488275279.png


The faint black line is where the label would be cut (the area outside it is the "bleed" which is printed so that there's leeway in case the cut isn't exact).

@dickthebaker would adjust the colors in the design (white background, which isn't exactly white, the green, the "Indiana" text, etc.) to match the actual colors on the chip. He previously color-matched to his printer from sample sets that @BearMetal sent him. So if you're going to mix original and replacement inlays labels, go with @dickthebaker.
 
I spent some time improving the matching for the "2.0" version of the label design. Here it is next to an actual $5 primary chip:

View attachment 1170111

The faint black line is where the label would be cut (the area outside it is the "bleed" which is printed so that there's leeway in case the cut isn't exact).

@dickthebaker would adjust the colors in the design (white background, which isn't exactly white, the green, the "Indiana" text, etc.) to match the actual colors on the chip. He previously color-matched to his printer from sample sets that @BearMetal sent him. So if you're going to mix original and replacement inlays labels, go with @dickthebaker.

I'm not a designer but that looks almost indistinguishable from pixel perfect, down to the overlapping circles and shaping around the letter strokes.

Thanks for the designs!
 
I spent some time improving the matching for the "2.0" version of the label design. Here it is next to an actual $5 primary chip:

View attachment 1170111

The faint black line is where the label would be cut (the area outside it is the "bleed" which is printed so that there's leeway in case the cut isn't exact).

@dickthebaker would adjust the colors in the design (white background, which isn't exactly white, the green, the "Indiana" text, etc.) to match the actual colors on the chip. He previously color-matched to his printer from sample sets that @BearMetal sent him. So if you're going to mix original and replacement inlays labels, go with @dickthebaker.
This looks perfect. How can I get a sheet or two of front and back labels of primary $5s?
 
This looks perfect. How can I get a sheet or two of front and back labels of primary $5s?
Well the label design is the same front and back. I recreated the designs but do not mass produce labels.

However, @dickthebaker does (testimonial thread). I’ve emailed him the revised design. Not sure what his workload or availability is right now though.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account and join our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Back
Top Bottom