Reason(s) for Dropping a Home Game

legonick

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Interesting read! I like hosting tournaments. If you like hosting, I'd talk to the host, bring up the shortcomings, and ask to take over the game. If he's not interested but you still like hosting, poach away! That rake seems really high for what's provided - fails on the rake/value part. And it doesn't sound like you have many friends in the game, at least not any more - fails on social front. So I'd try to poach it or move on. Sounds like you moved on. Maybe do other current or past players a favor and see if you can get them into the game you are joining if they are good people. I'm sure they see the same shortcomings you saw in that game.
 

Mojo1312

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Twenty past six my phone rang.

"Hello Dave" (Caller ID)

"Hello E-Z"

"How was the game last night?"

"Good. We had a full table." "Would you like a seat for the game this week?"

"Sure. Six o'clock, right?

"Yes. Do you have the address?"

"I think so, but give it to me again."

"350 XXXX Rd, Blankety-blank."

"Got it. Thank you for the invite Dave."

"Your welcome. See you Tuesday."

The only thing I have left to say, is.....

 

Mojo1312

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Quick update from your humble but nonetheless mighty host before he turns back to bed after feeding his diminishing song bird population this morning.

Stakes: $1/$2, $100 to $300 buy-in.

Out of ten players, eight bought in for $300, Hero bought in for $220 and the player to his left bought in for two bills. $2820 on the table to start.

EZ provided action and played a little wide early, donking off $440.

Bluff/Steal of the night: Hero raises with pocket Kings pre-flop. Hero c-bets a jack high board on the flop and gets called from the player to his left. Hero checks to Villain on the turn. Villain bets $75 and reveals his hand, a set of jacks, after Hero makes the call. The host brings to his attention that there is one card left to go. Villain asks what the rule is in this situation and offers to check the hand down. Host asks Hero what he would like to do. Hero declines the Villain's offer of checking the hand down. The 10 of spades appears on the river, completing an OESD. Hero ships his stack. Laughter from the other players ensues. Villain tanks briefly and folds.

Bad beat of the night (for Hero): $15 pre-flop action, Hero limps in EP with 9,T suited. Three way action, Hero hits his flush on the turn with one suited over card on the board after aggressively betting the flop. Hero c-bets his flush. Villain one makes the nut straight, calls. Villain two who flopped top pair comes along with a jack high flush draw.

Fourth club lands on the river. Checks all around. As @Anthony Martino would say: Womp! Womp!

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^^ No "magic beans" at this table.

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Players rave about the steak and pasta dish the host serves.

Last night's dish: Shrimp, chicken and vegetable medley over white rice along with homemade coffee cake from the small family owned bakery in town.

Hero asked the host if he knew @DrStrange. Host asked, Dr. Who?


All in all, a good game, and a huge improvement from the $50 tournament/$1/$2 cash game Hero dropped. Two decks of DaVinci Route's are constantly in play, Hijack shuffles. After the hand, the deck is passed to the Cutoff who cuts the deck before placing it on the cut card for the button to deal. At midnight, the host polls the remaining players whether they want to continue playing or call it a night. The game ends at 12:30 when the vote to play is unanimous or short one.

The players are better skilled and have a deeper bag of tricks than the crowd of regulars from Hero's local game. The big winner at the table, who was in for $600, cashed out with $2180. Pre-flop bets run a little high for $1/$2. This might be due in part to the fact that nearly everyone at the table is use to playing $2/$5. Hero made a modest $80 profit for the evening.
 
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LeLe

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Seem like a fun game, it great that thing turn out all good for you :)
 

Mojo1312

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This table looks like an amazing relic from some long-gone back room. Any more pictures and/or story behind it?

Interesting that you would ask the same question that entered my mind. I didn't examine the red wine colored leather closely to find out if it was authentic. It is padded and the table is of a heavier build than it's modern counterparts. Reupholstering the center would really enhance the look of the table.

I will ask about the table's history the next time I am there. It sits 10 comfortably.
 

JustinInMN

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Bluff/Steal of the night: Hero raises with pocket Kings pre-flop. Hero c-bets a jack high board on the flop and gets called from the player to his left. Hero checks to Villain on the turn. Villain bets $75 and reveals his hand, a set of jacks, after Hero makes the call. The host brings to his attention that there is one card left to go. Villain asks what the rule is in this situation and offers to check the hand down. Host asks Hero what he would like to do. Hero declines the Villain's offer of checking the hand down. The 10 of spades appears on the river, completing an OESD. Hero ships his stack. Laughter from the other players ensues. Villain tanks briefly and folds.
Wow, that's is an awesome bluff, well played.

Checking it down isn't much of an offer, once villain exposed his hand he can't really bet or raise anyway, you can play perfectly against him. Or you can run a bluff anyway. He was probably trying to avoid the exact spot you put him in.

Very well played.
 

Mojo1312

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Wow, that's is an awesome bluff, well played.

Checking it down isn't much of an offer, once villain exposed his hand he can't really bet or raise anyway, you can play perfectly against him. Or you can run a bluff anyway. He was probably trying to avoid the exact spot you put him in.

Very well played.

Villain has been running through Hero's mind today. Players move up in rank by exposing themselves to other games. There is a certain poker etiquette that Hero would like to think is commonplace among players who seek out such games, one is being gracious as a new player and to keep the rapport friendly with unknowns.

Let's name the villain to Hero's left Jack, short for Jack and Jill, Jack in the box and Jackass.

Hero casually remarks to Jack at the beginning of the evening that the two of them are the only ones at the table who bought in for less than the table max of $300. Jack's reply? "You will have a chance to buy more chips when I take your stack." ?!?!

Alright Jack. Duly noted. This is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.

Subsequently, Hero didn't miss any action in hands involving Jack leading up to the Hand referenced above. The key here is that Jack bought in for $200 and Hero reasoned correctly that he might be a tight player. Standard line for Hero in a friendly/new home game would be to accept the Villain's offer to check it down. Hero would have lost his $125 graciously and moved on.

However, as the saying goes, "Not this time Jack." Hero was hoping to hit the miracle King on the river, but decided to turn his hand into a bluff when he missed.

Halfway through the evening as dinner is being served, Hero called a $15 pre-flop raise in MP with Q,T off-suit, flopping a full boat. Checks to Hero, Hero checks. Jack bets $35 with an OESD. Folds to Hero, Hero flats.

The turn card is a King. Hero checks. Jack moves all-in and immediately gets up from the table to beat the other players to the food line. Jack, you see, is a real winner.

Hero sits back and waits for Jack's return. The player to Hero's right turns around in his seat and notifies Jack of Hero's call. Jack saunters over to the table with his piping hot bowl of food and confidently reveals his straight. Hero reaches out to his cards and flips over the boat. The player to Hero's right slides him the pot. Jack asks aloud "Does he have me covered?" Hero graciously responds, "Yes Sir"
 

EricMichael

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I'm just getting back into starting a home game but what I will tell you is that in the past we NEVER took any money from the home games. For us it wasn't about the money, but our group getting together after a shitty work week (because that's the nature of our business) and having a good time.

As for the degenerates he allowed to play, I attribute that mess to all of you for not speaking up sooner. The game probably would have flourished in the past if the guy kept a quality bunch of players and immediately ejected the two others. And therein lies the issue with collecting money to host game.

I get that initially it's expensive and there might not be other options but the risks of being reported for taking off the top aren't worth it. He was scared because he turned what is suppose to be something fun and to keep your skills fresh into something different. Let's face it, you're not getting rich off a weekly $50 buy-in tournament.

My honest opinion, and not trying to sound like a dick, is to express your concerns to the guy, tell him to drop his rake and try to refocus on building a quality game. I don't like this next suggestion but if he's that hard up for cash maybe after things get rolling he could ask for donations with no obligation to contribute; he can say it's to continue to better the game with new tables, chairs etc.
 

DeusEx

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To avoid a rake, you can BuyIn + EntryFee (or FoodFund). That small of a tourney shouldn't take funds out of the pool. If it is a regular thing, there is a cost and the guy shouldn't have to fade it.

Food and 'rent' are things that should be taken care of, it sounds like the game is a bit more on the hobby side and change is needed.
 

DeusEx

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Yeah my wording was ambiguous, I meant that in lieu of taking the rake directly out of the pool, which could be considered 'sneaky'; the host could do an entry fee.

They are already in opposition of the law, I didn't mean for it to sound as an alternative to a rake, I think most players would prefer someone be upfront with the action, than backhandedly take it from the pool w/o notice.
 

TX_Golf_N_Poker

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Seems like a lot of new people in here reading the first post, then commenting with suggestions, not realizing that you have long since solved your problem and moved on from the original host's game. I guess 4 pages are too much to skim through?
 

Mojo1312

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This table looks like an amazing relic from some long-gone back room. Any more pictures and/or story behind it?

Hello @upNdown !

The host joined the local card game at Elton's in 1986. They played $5/$10 limit hold-em and seven card stud, two orbits of the former followed by one orbit of the latter. Elton hosted the game for "well over a decade" before Dave's arrival at the tender age of 19. When Elton passed, a number of players expressed an interest in buying the table, but the son refused to sell.

Two years later, Dave approached the son and said "I know you don't want to sell the table, but if you would like it to go to a home where it will be used for card games, give me a call. Elton's son told Dave on the spot that he could borrow the table under the condition he would return it when asked, and the rest is history.

According to Dave, Elton reupholstered the table twice. The pad in the center is quite thick and soft, making it difficult to count the height of the chip stacks from across the table. It is supported by a set of two folding legs. Each leg has two braces, instead of a single brace. The table, based on the best information, dates back to the late sixties. Two other players from last night's game, who are in their late fifties, played at Elton's with Dave. How cool is that!?

I may look under the table for a manufacturer's stamp once I have developed a history with the host and a rapport with the rest of the players.

Pictures from last night's game.

Player with the bills in front of his stack cashed out with $3456 after buying in for $300 and adding on for another $250.

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Hero sitting on approximately $975. He lost his first buy-in when he couldn't get off of A,Q heads-up on an A,T,3,T,7 board. Villain had A,K.

In for $520, out for $1226.

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Wish I would have taken a picture of the spread. Grass fed ribeye cooked to perfection on the grill, sliced and tossed with pasta and mushrooms.

Absolutely fantastic!

Picture of Hero's stack and a splashed pot from earlier in the evening.

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On my way home with @David O's money.

Notice the fuel gauge. Low fuel light lit up 13 miles from home.

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