I know I'm just paranoid. But am I just paranoid? (1 Viewer)

Go to other local home games and ask the local players if they've heard of any games getting busted.
Screen_Shot_2017_07_13_at_1.09.20_PM.jpeg
 
Many states or cities will allow laws prohibiting home games to stay on the books, but don't really enforce them unless something outrageous happens. My state is this way. Home poker is strictly illegal, but there's lots of home poker.

I worked as a police officer for 25 years, and knew people played poker for money. (The local volunteer firemen were notorious.) My agency never raided a game, and if I ever suggested arresting people for playing home poker, they would have sent me for psych eval.

I was once invited to play in a cash game with the chief of police, two senior police officers, the fire chief and a state magistrate who, ironically, would be the judge who would arraign the rest of us at court if we were arrested for playing. The game was too rich for me, so I passed.

Back in 2008, one game in a private home in Middletown, Delaware, got raided by the state police, but they had high-rollers bringing $10,000 to the game, valet parking with tons of cars clogging up the development and topless waitresses selling drinks, so they were breaking several other laws beyond gambling. Eventually, someone reported them -- somebody who didn't get invited, no doubt.

In the U.S. right now, 44 states have some kind of licensed casino. And casinos often oppose any effort to legalize home poker, since they see it as cutting into their revenue. And casinos contribute to the campaigns of elected officials. It's all very convenient for them -- and corrupt.
you had me at topless waitresses :cool

chris farley snl GIF
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account and join our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Back
Top Bottom