2024 UPDATED: Paulson Colors converted to CMYK/RGB/PANTONE (1 Viewer)

matthewb

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Hello everyone!

I love to design chips in my free time, and if you do to, you can understand the importance of consistency between your colors. Having a good color palette solves that problem. @QuailValley 's goal was to create custom card molds that closely match the colors of famous Paulson poker chip sets. They achieved this by compiling HEX codes from @Tommy 's Paulson Chip Design Tool, converting them to RGB and CMYK formats, and matching these to Pantone colors to ensure accuracy despite the inherent challenges in color reproduction across different mediums.

And this is where I'm stepping in. The original spreadsheet was never finished, for what I would assume to be very understandable reasons. Lately I've been making lots of spreadsheets and designing a new set. I said, "What the hell, why not", went ahead and applied several filters to the list using AI, and transferred the results. While I made minor enhancements, the core integrity of the project remains intact. Although you might still find small errors, just be sure to let me know to get it cleaned up.

Here is the NEW Spreadsheet: https://1drv.ms/x/c/fca00913bac8bfdf/EaU4IWtjGHFHkeLKHcpVbPMBUoN72v_zFlwlzV_QAv8lvw

2024 Updated Paulson Colors & Pantone List.png



Sources:
@QuailValley 's original spreadsheet: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1JeRS1goTKyxHee6cYQ8o8I3KKNEnO4TiMPgwViLokYU/edit#gid=0
@Tommy 's PCF Paulson Chip Design Tool: https://www.pokerchipforum.com/pcf/pokerchiptool/
@Kid_Eastwood 's Pantone screenshots: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1HbzLVH5aznUFJUihsR3wsCwZtMlxZ7k-/view

File -> Save As -> Download a Copy
 
Thanks for compiling this.
Getting colors across different formats can be tricky considering certain colors just aren’t attainable with different color systems.
I’ve found that to be quite evident with colors on Tina chips. While she originally suggested we design using Pantone colors, she doesn’t print using Pantone inks. Heck, we all set up in CMYK, and I don’t think her printers even use that system either…she may be doing chips in 6-color.
Unfortunately, I’ve found with some of her chip colors that the system of trial-and-error is sometimes necessary.
 
Thanks for compiling this.
Getting colors across different formats can be tricky considering certain colors just aren’t attainable with different color systems.
I’ve found that to be quite evident with colors on Tina chips. While she originally suggested we design using Pantone colors, she doesn’t print using Pantone inks. Heck, we all set up in CMYK, and I don’t think her printers even use that system either…she may be doing chips in 6-color.
Unfortunately, I’ve found with some of her chip colors that the system of trial-and-error is sometimes necessary.
Great information right here! It could be worth putting together a CMYK set of sample chips, similar to the old school pizza palette chips I saw way back in the day for people to use.

I don't currently own Illustrator, although I use Inkscape. Would need someone to do the CMYK conversion. (Can't remember if that is easy or not, it's been a minute.)
 
Same problem with MSK. You give them a Pantone code, they find some variant of the base color and use the CMYK there. You give them a CMYK value, it won't match anything you might be trying to match it against. Hopeless.

Only one I know this to be doing well and professionally is @Gear.
 
1) Thank you for your work!

2) @Colquhoun ’s point about print and production methods is important.

Recently I was working on short-run inlay designs, using a better than average but not high-end inkjet printer, glossy waterproof vinyl, and self-sealing laminate.

Meanwhile, I havent recalibrated my monitor in some time.

In order to select shades matching base or spot colors on various chips, I printed out a HEX color chart on the vinyl, and laminated it.

I then could hold actual chips up against the actual finished color output, to know exactly what I could expect from my equipment. I’d find a color match on the sheet and input that HEX value into my design program.

Then I didn’t have to worry about monitor variations.

This I found was the only reliable way to get accurate results, and saved a lot of trial-and-error mistakes.

With a third party vendor, I think the equivalent would be to send them chip samples for color matching (assuming they are willing to adjust your submissions). Vendors like @Gear have lots of samples in house. Not sure to what extent Tina et al. are willing to tweak artwork or if they just run with what you submit; I’ve not ordered from “her.”
 
1) Thank you for your work!

2) @Colquhoun ’s point about print and production methods is important.

Recently I was working on short-run inlay designs, using a better than average but not high-end inkjet printer, glossy waterproof vinyl, and self-sealing laminate.

Meanwhile, I havent recalibrated my monitor in some time.

In order to select shades matching base or spot colors on various chips, I printed out a HEX color chart on the vinyl, and laminated it.

I then could hold actual chips up against the actual finished color output, to know exactly what I could expect from my equipment. I’d find a color match on the sheet and input that HEX value into my design program.

Then I didn’t have to worry about monitor variations.

This I found was the only reliable way to get accurate results, and saved a lot of trial-and-error mistakes.

With a third party vendor, I think the equivalent would be to send them chip samples for color matching (assuming they are willing to adjust your submissions). Vendors like @Gear have lots of samples in house. Not sure to what extent Tina et al. are willing to tweak artwork or if they just run with what you submit; I’ve not ordered from “her.”
I can’t trust colors on screen, or even a Pantone book. I have a couple racks of various Tina chipset samples with known CMYK values. That’s all I’ve been using lately for color, and as you point out, the only way to be sure what to expect.
 

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