Wynn $8 fake?

NeverOB

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Anyone have the Wynn Chinese new year chips and a black light? I just got a black light and was having fun checking all my chips. But all my Wynn chips are UV marked except for the 2012 dragon chip I own. Possibly fake??
IMG_20200213_124905.jpg
 

ReallyGoodUsername

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It’s super super difficult / impossible to recreate anything close to a Paulson poker chip and would require likely a $70,000+ (Total guess but likely more) investment to produce. If anyone could produce something that close they’d make a ton more money legally selling to casinos/us than scamming a few hundred $8 chips.

edit: the color matching alone would likely cost them $20k
 

ReallyGoodUsername

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The ONLY possible illegal explanation I can dream of would be someone in the factory sneaking them off the line before they got to the marking process but I don’t even know if that’s possible/makes sense with how they make them.
 

upNdown

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It’s super super difficult / impossible to recreate anything close to a Paulson poker chip and would require likely a $70,000+ (Total guess but likely more) investment to produce. If anyone could produce something that close they’d make a ton more money legally selling to casinos/us than scamming a few hundred $8 chips.

edit: the color matching alone would likely cost them $20k
Except for the guys who were doing it with sharpies.
 

ReallyGoodUsername

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Except for the guys who were doing it with sharpies.
That was altering of an existing chip not manufacturing a totally new one. That and I’m not sure removing a security feature from an $8 chip to turn it into an $8 chip without a security feature would be the best way to go about making money :D
 

NeverOB

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Maybe they just realized that an $8 casino chip wasn't worth the extra cost for the UV security feature anymore? Do newer ones (after 2012) have a security feature?
I agree with everyone that the chip very likely is not fake. The coloration, mold, and label all show no signs of counterfeit. My best guess is that somehow the UV marking was washed off. I'm not sure how hard that would be, and both sides? Or maybe someone just goofed and forgot to order the markings or add them during manufacturing that year. That's why I was curious if anyone else has this chip and a black light. But Wynn did not just decide that the markings were no longer worth it. They marked the 2013 snake chip, and then the less valuable $1 Chinese New year chips the following 4 years. So logically, it doesn't appear to be omitted on purpose.
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Flat12

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Are the Chinese gambling patronage a huge deal over at Stateside ? I seem to see Chinese New Year commemorative chips as a regular thing with casinos. Typically with this chip, they even chose 8 for the denom.....in Chinese Cantonese dialect '8' signifies 'Prosperity' since all the Chinamen ever think about is money, money, money.
 

allforcharity

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Chinese people, for whatever reason, are some of the most notorious gamblers wherever they are. There is way more money in Macau than there is in Vegas on any given day, except for right now because of the coronavirus scare.

Why, then, did the Chinese-themed Lucky Dragon fail? Because when Chinese people are travelling, the LAST place they want to go is to a Chinese-themed hotel and casino.
 

BGinGA

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My best guess is that somehow the UV marking was washed off.
Afaik, the UV markings are on the underside of the inlay laminate, not on the exposed surface.

UV is an extra-charge security feature. Perhaps it was simply omitted from the design specification.
 

Flat12

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Chinese people, for whatever reason, are some of the most notorious gamblers wherever they are. There is way more money in Macau than there is in Vegas on any given day, except for right now because of the coronavirus scare.

Why, then, did the Chinese-themed Lucky Dragon fail? Because when Chinese people are travelling, the LAST place they want to go is to a Chinese-themed hotel and casino.
All things being equal, I think Americans are equally as enthusiastic for a good gamble as anyone else. The history of America has been rich with gambling for as long as one can remember since the Old West and Frontier days.

The Chinese tidal wave of high rollers came in lockstep with China's ascendancy as an economic superpower. Macau, being the only jurisdiction where gambling is legalized by China, naturally becomes a magnet for the newly minted Chinese super rich but junkets/syndicates feature prominently in facilitating high roller action at Macau since a lot of the high roller money is illegitimate and China's currency restriction bans its citizens from transferring more than US$50,000 off the mainland each year and/or US$ 3,000 per day (a pittance from the perspective any high roller, or even a normal Chinese gambler). Macau, if I remember correctly, was raking in at least 7x the gambling revenues compared to Vegas. Folks like Wynn are making a killing there from Chinese high rollers and Wynn's main income, by far, is still from Wynn Macau.

Macau is interesting and also vulnerable because over 80% of its revenue is from gambling. China has been gradually trying to diversify Macau beyond its reliance purely on gaming revenue in an attempt to insulate it from economic shocks that tend to be magnified given the territory's dependence on one income stream. Interesting to note as well that Macau has been trying to improve its value as an entertainment hub (as opposed to pure gaming) but in this respect it still cannot rival Vegas which has a more established entertainment infrastructure which rake in a significant portion of revenue in addition to gaming receipts. There are several recent video footages taken recently by casino patrons at the outset of the Coronavirus epidemic.....from Macau, Genting Malaysia and Marina Bay Sand Singapore. Empty gaming tables and parking lots. They are going to be hard hit.

Lucky Dragon, Vegas. They failed because they are heavily leveraged and could not compete with the other casinos in terms of comps, promotion packages and competition for the same customer base. The neighboring Palace Station and SLS properties got them beat in terms of upping their ante to attract customers (Chinese patrons included). I think patrons were also complaining Lucky Dragons lack of table games such as baccarat.
 
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