what the best starting stack for 5 people who are new to poker

thatguyyouknow

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what the best starting stack for 5 people who are new to poker. me and my friends are trying to get into poker and want to know what the best starting stack is for us. any suggestions
 

Eriks

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Assuming tournament, the general consensus is (T10k using T25/100/500/1k chips) either 8/8/6/6 or 12/12/5/6. Starting blinds at 25/50 or 50/100 depending on whether you’d like deeper starting stacks or not. Add a couple of 5k chips if you want even deeper play.
 

Kid_Eastwood

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If you're new I'd go with the new trend and use a T100 based starting stack if you play tournaments.

You can have 20,000 starting as 10/6/11/1 (100/500/1000/5000).

For 5 players :
100 x 50
500 x 30
1000 x 60
5000 x 10
--> 150 chips in total

This includes extra 1000 to color-up the 100 and extra 5000 to color-up the 500.

You can have starting blinds 100-100 (200 BB) or 100-200 (100 BB).
 

msuroo

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For brand new players, I would never use 8/8/x starting stacks. New players play too many hands and limp a lot - you need more small denom chips to avoid slowing the game down. My “new player” set (for kids/nephews/non-poker friends etc), is T5 base, which makes it “feel” lower stakes. I like 15/13/11/1 (5/25/100/500) for a 2k starting stack, but honestly wouldn’t be opposed to 20/20/14 (5/25/100).
 

Poker Zombie

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For new players I prefer T5 based tournaments, as you get a lot of chips for limping, and the blind structure moves slowly for the first hour - when people are still figuring out if a straight or a flush is better.

T5 x15
T25 x13
T100 x6
T500 and T1000 varies depending on how late you are targeting the night to last.
 

Redcard71

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I have to agree with @msuroo:
... I like 15/13/11/1 (5/25/100/500) for a 2k starting stack, but honestly wouldn’t be opposed to 20/20/14 (5/25/100).
It's easy to have chips at the ready. That's exactly two full barrels, so they can be at the ready for distribution, two buyins to a rack. For the longest time this is how I put away my chips to get ready for the next T2000.
 

philhut

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For new players I prefer T5 based tournaments, as you get a lot of chips for limping, and the blind structure moves slowly for the first hour - when people are still figuring out if a straight or a flush is better.

T5 x15
T25 x13
T100 x6
T500 and T1000 varies depending on how late you are targeting the night to last.
Some people like tournaments that start with the 5value, others start with 25value, others 100....and so on. To each their own, I personally like the 25/100/500/1000/5000 value allocation for tournaments.

Was about to write the same thing. New players will make mistakes and will still want to keep playing. A starting stack of ~5000 in chip value starting 25/50 blinds increasing per typical multiples with rebuys until a the 100/200 or 200/400 level will keep everyone playing for at least a hour or so.

Here is my plan with HSI chips for 5k starting stacks. You could +/- the 500 and 1000 value chips to come to the same value. If you are buying in once without any rebuys or have friends with a large amount of patience and or a love for poker then 10,000+ starting stacks could be used with the same starting blinds. If playing just one table I would suggest more 1k chips and less 500's like in my picture.

Also consider colour up chips....all of the 25 ,100 and even potentially 500 chips could be rounded up later in the game to same real estate space on the table as the chips pile up. A few high value chips will take care of this easily.

6BUHzvC.jpg


You could go with the breakdowns as above..... the one on the left is probably something you could consider if you want to use less overall chips. My preferred starting stack is the 12/12/5/1 which could also be 12/12/3/2 multiply the # of starting stacks plus the 25 & 100 value (could also include 500 value) in extra 1000 and/or 5000 value chips to cover the colour ups.....plus additional chips can be added for rebuys.

In my set above rebuys for 5k would be 0/0/4/3.

60-25
60-100
45-500
30-1000
5-5000
200 chips should get you done for 5 people
 
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Poker Zombie

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Some people like tournaments that start with the 5value, others start with 25value, others 100....and so on. To each their own, I personally like the 25/100/500/1000/5000 value allocation for tournaments.
I also prefer base T25 tournaments, but for new players T5 simply works better.

It has less to do with function than psychology. New players don't think in terms of Big Blinds, they only think in terms of numbers...
  1. How many physical chips do I have in front of me? You and I know that is not as relevant as the value of the chips you have, but new players look down at 4x T1000 chips and think they are doing terrible, even though the starting stack was T2000. They want a lot of physical chips in front of them.
  2. Confusing tournament chips for real money. A 4BB "raise to 200" sounds like "raise to $200" to the new guy. Suddenly in the first level we are playing for car payments. However, in a T5 base game, that 4BB raise is only a "raise to 40" or "raise to $40" in their head. That is a much easier amount to digest.
  3. New players don't think about how they are doing until they run out of their lowest denomination. Having 15x T5s is better than 12x T25s, as they get more hands to play before they think they are doing poorly. Remember, poker has a reputation generated in popular culture as being a game played by scoundrels and gunslingers. The longer they go before they think they are losing, the more time you have for them to think "I like this game".
 
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