What do YOU think happens when you die?

MathijsVS

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Was raised Catholic by my family, hopped off that wagon ages ago.

My philosophy to life (and after) comes from my dad: there's nothing after life. It just ends.
Believing in something that comes after just makes you at peace with whatever problems there are in your life, in stead of facing those obstacles and fixing them.

You want a big ass mansion and celebrate with all your loved ones in an idyllic garden? Good on you, but why wait until after? Just do it now. Work your ass off if you want the mansion, make plenty of time for your loved ones and idyllic gardens may require some gardening, gardeners or including your local park or yard into your definition of "idyllic gardens" :)

If you want those things, go for them! Don't wait :) And if you want my advice: start with the loved-ones-thing first. You never know when you might no longer be able to do it.

As Tim Minchin said it in "Storm":

But here's what gives me a hard-on:
I am a tiny, insignificant, ignorant bit of carbon.
I have one life, and it is short and unimportant...
But thanks to recent scientific advances I get to live
Twice as long as my great great great great uncleses and auntses.
Twice as long to live this life of mine
Twice as long to love this wife of mine
Twice as many years of friends and wine
Of sharing curries and getting shitty at good-looking hippies
With fairies on their spines and butterflies on their titties.


He's talking about the science vs alternatives debate, but I feel it applies to a great many religious themes as well.

It's just my 2cents. I don't expect other people to be convinced, or to believe the same thing or whatever.
It's an essential freedom to believe whatever you want to believe, and as long as you're not hurting others, I have no business deciding that for you, but I'll happily debate it with you. Preferably at a bar, or somewhere with a decent liquor cabinet :D
 

Chipton

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I’m a big fan of this theory:
But I think it’s most likely that after death, there is absolutely nothing. No afterlife, no memory, no dreaming, everything you have done in life is pointless to yourself. The only thing that will be remembered is what you did to others. And eventually, even that will be forgotten too.
That might be the most interesting concept of death that I have ever heard.

Thanks for sharing!
 

dajebriza

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There is a bigger structure and reality to the universe than we are capable of observing or comprehending. We are the gold fish in the bowl, and we have explored, tested and understand a lot about our environment and existence inside the bowl, but we are completely unaware and unable to measure, observe or comprehend what is going on outside the bowl, which is also potentially limitless in size and complexity. The universe is indifferent to us. Our electrical impulses cease and like a still machine that is no longer carrying out its purposeful function, like a computer network deprived of power, we will perceive nothing and no longer exists outside of a measureable amount of life-less atoms that will begin their entropic process of dispersal and joining the chaos.
 
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crussader

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...quantum entanglement certainly appears to support the hypothesis that other dimensions likely exist that we don't fully understand yet....
The exact number of dimensions is irrelevant. The point is that science suggests that there is likely more out there than we currently see. Your post seems to confirm that.
 

crussader

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I guess we'll all find out eventually. Either there will be something after or there won't. In either case, a lot of people are going to be very wrong. Which begs the question, What are the consequences of being wrong? (The question applies to both sides)
 

crussader

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remember what it was like before you were born?

it's exactly like that.
Just because we don't remember being in the womb now doesn't mean our time there was absent of a real tactile experience at the time. Fetuses do respond to stimuli, don't they?
 

raynmanas

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Just because we don't remember being in the womb now doesn't mean our time there was absent of a real tactile experience at the time. Fetuses do respond to stimuli, don't they?

remember what it was like before you were born conceived?

it's exactly like that.
 

crussader

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remember what it was like before you were born conceived?

it's exactly like that.
So what was that like? Just because we don't remember now, doesn't prove there was no consciousness then. Does the butterfly have any memory of being a caterpillar?
 

raynmanas

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So what was that like? Just because we don't remember now, doesn't prove there was no consciousness then. Does the butterfly have any memory of being a caterpillar?

if no memory of something exists, did it actually happen? o_O
 

pltrgyst

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Just because we don't remember being in the womb now doesn't mean our time there was absent of a real tactile experience at the time. Fetuses do respond to stimuli, don't they?

So do plants and invertebrates.
 

Mojo1312

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This guy is drowning in the ocean. He is having a very hard time keeping his head above water. A boat comes by and the first mate asks "Are you alright?" "I'm okay. I have faith in God. Move on." The boat goes away. Just then a helicopter full of tourists comes by and they come down and look at him and ask "Are you alright? Do you need any help?" The man looks up at them and says "I'm fine. I have faith in God. Move on."

The man drowns. He goes up to heaven and he looks at God and says: "I prayed and prayed. What happened?" God says to him, "I sent you a boat and a helicopter." ~ Dom DeLuise
 

Geremie

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Sometimes I’m sad for all the memories and work that just disappear when a hard drive is discarded, knowing that it just takes a few random electrons to activate it all again.
Then I laugh and eat a zebra
Is it better medium or medium rare?
 

Coyote

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Even science has found out that you can't annihilate either substance or energy. They both are transformed to other forms of substance or energy, let alone they 're interchangeable.

But faith about the transcendental / metaphysical is not dependent on knowledge (science) and they are parallel; not intersecting. It would be pure idiocy to use any of the two against the other.

My religious (ie arbitrary) view is that the "soul" is energy. Nobody knows if the "soul" keeps the memory and identity of the human who held it in this world. Even so, it would be meaningless to expect to meet "loved ones".
"Loved ones" are such because we here are morally low and practically mean. We can only love a very limited number of fellow human beings, the ones mostly associated with our own survival in this world.

The Christian God (if he/she/it exists) says we should love all human beings indiscriminately. There 's absolutely no reason loving your mom more than the unknown ugly lady passing through the street out of the window.
If you 're good (loving) enough you 'll find other souls (energy points) in the other world to share and be happy to eternity.
Hell is just isolation due to hatred (not a basement with boilers).
 

99%evil

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When you die, you respawn in one of the 5 non captured flag areas. If you are lucky you aren't in a room with a couple 9 year olds that have a joystick surgically attached to them that take you out 3 seconds after you have respawned. Sadly sometimes they continue to do this until you lose your mind and like a fool yell at a 9 year old for being a piece of shit.

So happy I stopped playing COD many years ago. I'm a happier person now.
 
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If I'm wrong, and I end up at the Pearly Gates for judgement, I like to think that I could explain exactly why I never believed in him (lack if evidence, biblical contradictions, existence of so many other religions). I would also ask him to explain some of the darkest parts of our existence here, like the Loa Loa which is famous for eating the eyes of children from the back to the front. He's got a lot to answer for, and I'm not afraid to hold his feet to the fire to get some answers.
 

ekricket

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If I'm wrong, and I end up at the Pearly Gates for judgement, I like to think that I could explain exactly why I never believed in him (lack if evidence, biblical contradictions, existence of so many other religions). I would also ask him to explain some of the darkest parts of our existence here, like the Loa Loa which is famous for eating the eyes of children from the back to the front. He's got a lot to answer for, and I'm not afraid to hold his feet to the fire to get some answers.
From Depeche Mode blasphemous rumors


“I don't want to start
Any blasphemous rumors
But I think that God's
Got a sick sense of humor
And when I die
I expect to find Him laughing”
 

trigs

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I was raised Roman Catholic, and despite going through the motions as a child, I always had a ton of questions and never fully believed in god. I was the little kid sitting in Sunday school asking questions that would eventually have them kindly request to my parents to not send me back anymore.

I always thought of myself as an agnostic even before I knew of the term. Atheist is definitely too strong of a term imho, and something people should really consider more closely before making a declaration about. As I've come to understand it, the difference between an atheist and an agnostic is that even if the actual god appeared in front of an atheist, spoke to them, and performed a miracle for them to witness, they still wouldn't believe in god's existence because they already absolutely KNOW god is not real. I really can't see myself just absolutely knowing that fact beyond all doubt (without using some faith ironically).

Majoring in philosophy in university introduced me to a ton of various theories about religion, and I the one that seemed to stick with me the most was from The Ethics by Baruch Spinoza. He so clearly argued that everything (god, universe, substance, nature) is just one whole singular substance that we are all just a part of, and that death is just a transition into a different part of the whole. I always kind of liked that idea of interconnectedness with everything around us.

As far as afterlife is concerned, I think a lot of people don't really consider what a "heaven" or afterlife would really be like. First of all, most people who believe in an afterlife are under the impression that we shed our physical bodies and exist only within our souls (maybe "within" is the wrong word, but you catch my drift). If that is the case, then we as humans truly cannot know what we'd think and feel at that point. Practically, all our wants, needs, desires, beliefs, etc. are based on or around the physical. To suddenly be completed void of all the physical, I'd be a completely different person (or mind, or entity, or immaterial being, or whatever). There is no way I could 100% know that I'd have any of the same feelings or emotions (after all, emotions are just chemical/hormonal reactions in my physical body which I don't possess anymore after death). Would I still "love" my love ones? I honestly don't know. How can one love without the physical? Is it possible? I'm not god after all, who is (allegedly) omnibenevolent (i.e. all-loving).

I'd like to think there's more to the universe than just this existence, but minus any proof I don't think I will be completely altering the way I live banking on an afterlife. I'm just not that type of person, no offense to god, but if god is real, it would know that about me anyway.

Personally, just cremate my remains and get rid of them however you see fit. Or maybe do the "green" burial where they bury my remains but add whatever chemicals to it so it biodegrades and turns into compost quickly, but I'm only cool with that as long as where ever I'm buried that land is actually being used and not just a waste of space cemetery full of headstones that no one has visited for decades - just make it a nice green space/park please.
 

trigs

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If I'm wrong, and I end up at the Pearly Gates for judgement, I like to think that I could explain exactly why I never believed in him (lack if evidence, biblical contradictions, existence of so many other religions). I would also ask him to explain some of the darkest parts of our existence here, like the Loa Loa which is famous for eating the eyes of children from the back to the front. He's got a lot to answer for, and I'm not afraid to hold his feet to the fire to get some answers.
Haven't you read the Book of Job? Best story in the bible. God and the devil are hanging out (like usual obviously), and the devil talks god into messing around with Job, who happens to be one of god's best and most loyal followers. The devil tells god that he can f*ck with Job so badly that Job will begin to question god's existence. God, obviously, is like "Sure thing devil man. Go f*ck with Job while we both sit back and watch what happens." So the devil does literally every possible terrible thing to Job he can think of. He kills all his livestock. He destroys all his crops. He curses Job with disease. He kills his whole family.

Throughout all of this, Job is talking to his buddies and they are all telling Job he must have done something to piss god off, but Job is like "No friggin' way, dudes. I was the most pious guy out there. I loved god and did everything for him. There's got to be another reason all this is happening to me." Finally, Job begins to question god and yells out that he wants to hold god accountable for all the terrible things happening to him because he truly does not believe he deserves it. Job never doubts god's existence though, but he questions god's providence. In the end of the story, god shows up (in a whirlwind obviously), and Job accuses god of doing terrible things to him for no reason. Job's friends, who are also there, are still like "God, we know that Job did something to piss you off, and that's why all these terrible things are happening to him." God looks at Job, he looks at Job's friends, and then states that they're all wrong and that their puny little human brains are not capable of understanding god's will and providence. End of story (well, god did reverse everything bad that happened to Job, but Job still had to endure all of that for absolutely no reason whatsoever). I think this is a great lesson ;)
 
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