Tipping at home games?

CraigT78

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This whole discussion has just made me sad that we're even talking about this for home games
Don't feel sad or bad at all.

Of my group of 25ish regulars, only 8-10 tip on a regular basis. Several others will randomly bring a bottle of something, and the rest do none of the above.

As a host, I appreciate it, but in no way expect it, or even give it much thought.

The biggest tip a player can give the host is "don't be an asshole".
 

CraigT78

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Whats the ettiquette if the host is down 5 mortgage payments. Sobbing uncontrollably
And youre standing there at 4 am with bundles of of $20s and $100s ?

So do I tip then? Throw them $5 and say 'hey bud, it aint so bad' ?

Id like to know before August 5th please.
Don't worry about the mortgage payments, just make sure I don't tap into the college funds.
 

JMC9389

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Whats the ettiquette if the host is down 5 mortgage payments. Sobbing uncontrollably
And youre standing there at 4 am with bundles of of $20s and $100s ?

So do I tip then? Throw them $5 and say 'hey bud, it aint so bad' ?

Id like to know before August 5th please.
Tell them to play better.
 

manamongkids

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Whats the ettiquette if the host is down 5 mortgage payments. Sobbing uncontrollably
And youre standing there at 4 am with bundles of of $20s and $100s ?

So do I tip then? Throw them $5 and say 'hey bud, it aint so bad' ?

Id like to know before August 5th please.
@MatB disgusting slander for two hosts in which host games you regularly attend
 

surfik

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I played the regular game with rotating dealer. It was going slow so my friend volunteered to deal for some time which accually speeded game a lot.
Anyway I played big hand with him (AK vs AQ) and won huge pot. After hand I tipped him 5 PLN (around 1.3 USD at that time).
Boy was he pissed..... and stopped dealing.


I do belive that dealer needs to be tipped as when you deal you can not keep the level of concentration. In another words it affects your game.

Regards
 

JustinInMN

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So let me ask this question - I've been to two meet-ups and often there are players that deal all day and night and others that manage the bank - am I supposed to tip them? This whole discussion has just made me sad that we're even talking about this for home games.
Honestly, the occasional round down is more than sufficient as far as I am concerned. I don't think hosts need to get rich, but a few players rounding down a few bucks means 10-15 dollars for the host. That helps keep the nice cards coming and the snacks out.

We can agree to disagree here on tipping the host. Please tell me WE ALL AGREE on tipping the dedicated dealer?
Oh that's mandatory. I usually only tip on pots get to the turn, but I figure I should be finding 2-3 bucks an hour for the dealer easy.

I don't think you have to tip the host huge or anything, but a couple bucks per player every night helps with snacks and provisions for sure.
 

RainmanTrail

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If it's a dedicated private dealer, who doesn't play in the game, I always tip. But if it's a player in the game then I won't tip. I also won't accept tips if I'm dealing and playing in the same game.
 

jrs146

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When I host most of the regulars will bring $10 to contribute to the food/drink cost. It’s not expected but most all do. I always spend at least double on the refreshments as I provide a full dinner and full bar. If someone didn’t contribute I wouldn’t think negatively at all. Most non-regulars don’t contribute unless they see the others but I never ask.
 

Schmendr1ck

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Whats the ettiquette if the host is down 5 mortgage payments. Sobbing uncontrollably
And youre standing there at 4 am with bundles of of $20s and $100s ?

So do I tip then? Throw them $5 and say 'hey bud, it aint so bad' ?

Id like to know before August 5th please.
In your case this is purely hypothetical, right?
 

Trihonda

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I am grateful people are willing to open their homes and host. If I am not hosting in return, I think it is appropriate to tip. I would honestly really struggle with not tipping in this case.
I really do appreciate it when folks contribute towards snacks and such, but I dont keep track, nor do I pay any attention when people don’t.

the last few games have been good to me.. so my world famous meatballs are back on the menu for this Thursday’s game!
 

TRAINERSTEVE

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I host usually 2x per month. For the MTT nights I charge $20/head and that covers the snacks, beer, and whiskey. I have two beers on tap and nobody really brings their own anymore.

For the single table cash games, I don't rake or take a hospitality charge, as most of the guys have already contributed $20 that month.

After each night, the winners usually tip, and I take anywhere from $50 to $150 in tips per night.

When I attend, I bring a brand new setup of cards with me as a host gift, as well as tipping $10-$20 when I leave.
That’s a cool idea to bring cards.
 

BGinGA

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That’s a cool idea to bring cards.
Not necessarily. Some folks around here are as nutjobs about high-end cards as they are about high-end chips. The chances of choosing the 'right' setup (brand, size, index) for any given individual's personal preference is actually pretty slim, unless you have insider knowledge beforehand.

90% of the gift decks I have received over the years were unusable by my standards... and I'm not alone in this regard.
 

upNdown

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Not necessarily. Some folks around here are as nutjobs about high-end cards as they are about high-end chips. The chances of choosing the 'right' setup (brand, size, index) for any given individual's personal preference is actually pretty slim, unless you have insider knowledge beforehand.

90% of the gift decks I have received over the years were unusable by my standards... and I'm not alone in this regard.
You can say that again. I once brought a deck of piatniks as a gift to a host. It was one of those single blue decks we got in that group buy. I thought I was bestowing the greatest gift, because they were my favorites and they were so hard to come by. The host graciously opened it and tried to put it in play, but it was bridge size, and he only had poker size cut cards, because that was all he used.
Oh well, lesson learned.
 

Poker Zombie

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Not necessarily. Some folks around here are as nutjobs about high-end cards as they are about high-end chips. The chances of choosing the 'right' setup (brand, size, index) for any given individual's personal preference is actually pretty slim, unless you have insider knowledge beforehand.

90% of the gift decks I have received over the years were unusable by my standards... and I'm not alone in this regard.
I have been gifted more boxes of Bicycle's Zombie playing cards than I can count.
1626787945946.png


Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the gesture, but paper and smaller than regular index. I often wonder if the "gifters" have ever wondered why the cards have not seen play. I agree with BGinGA, it's better to not gift cards unless you are certain of the "make and model". It puts the host in an awkward position of either looking ungrateful, or using substandard cards.
 

Jonesey07

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I have been gifted more boxes of Bicycle's Zombie playing cards than I can count.
View attachment 739230

Don't get me wrong, I appreciate the gesture, but paper and smaller than regular index. I often wonder if the "gifters" have ever wondered why the cards have not seen play. I agree with BGinGA, it's better to not gift cards unless you are certain of the "make and model". It puts the host in an awkward position of either looking ungrateful, or using substandard cards.
That's it. We're playing with these the next game I'm at!

At least a hand of go fish or something..
 

Statesvegas

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When he was 13, my son would watch me and my group play and he developed an interest in the game. We are a very casual group, and the number one rule is that the game will be a friendly game. In well over 2 years, there has not been a single argument at my game. Small stakes: usually .25/.50, but on rare occasion we will play .50/$1. We will also play tournaments with $50 buy ins for a full table.

Anyway, I invited my son to deal for the group without any objection from the players and they would tip him as a dedicated dealer. He paid attention, did a good job and if he ever made a mistake I cannot remember it. The first night he dealt for us was a tournament with a $100 buy in, and we had 10 players. That night, the winner tipped him $100 and he earned another $30 at the cash game afterwards. With our cash games, he usually earned between $40 and $60 in tips.

Eventually, he asked if he could play with the group using that tip money for his buy in. I had previously not allowed him to play with us because I did not want him gambling with money he was receiving for birthdays, etc., but for some twisted reason I viewed this tip money as different and allowed him to participate. My group had no reservation with him playing with us, so we game him a shot.

He has now turned those tips into a poker bankroll well over $1000, and at 14 years of age he is one of the strongest players in our group. It would appear that while dealing for my group, he was studying the players as much as as he was the game. He hasn't dealt for our group since his first time playing with us.

Tips for a dedicated dealer are a good thing.
 

Poker Zombie

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I Had contemplated starting a thread on Meet up etiquette.

Tipping the host should almost be mandatory.
THey've given huge amounts of time and energy putting it together. Amazingly generous to open up their homes to people .
All the utilities, and unseen costs that go into a meet up I couldn't even begin to imagine.

Even if you are down, a little something helps.
If your up, consider it other peoples money and tip more.
I think everyone going to a meet-up should do or contribute something, but tips or a financial contribution? I disagree.

Yes, cash is always appreciated, but so is beer, bourbon, and wine. Food contributions are always great. Ordering pizzas or a sub run helps out immensely if lunch was not planned. People gotta eat.

At longer, larger meet-ups, ice runs are needed because few people own ice machines capable of 20+ people. It's only a few bucks, but greatly helpful to a host who doesn't want to leave his house unattended - and whose car is probably blocked in.

Bottled water is often overlooked, but I've seen a case per day downed at some meets. Snacks will get nibbled on, but this is a "know the group" kind of contribution. At one meet-up Nutter Butters were all the rage, the next meet they went untouched leaving one more thing for the host to clean-up afterward. Which might not seem like a lot, but how many garbage cans does the host have? Meet-ups generate a lot of waste.

Speaking of waste, you can help a host greatly by knowing where their back-up supplies are. Trash bags need to be changed when the can is full. If you know ahead of time where cleaning supplies are, you wont need to distract the host who in tanking over a $300 pot with "Uh... where is your mop?"

Early arrival to help set-up or staying late to help tear down or clean up could be appreciated, or outright refused - check with your host.

The nice thing about a meet-up, is that nearly everyone there has hosted games. We all know the work involved in an evening of hosting, even if we are unaware that if is exponentially tougher when carried out for 3-4 continuous days.

But mandatory? I have skipped meet-ups where there was a fee for an Air BNB the host rented. I get it, if you live in a big city, you may not be able to host in your flat, but you are also asking people to buy airline tickets and perhaps even rent a car. Some drive for hours from their home. If you are staying in the Air BnB, I understand footing your share of the bill, but not everyone wants to sleep on a couch. Old age and hard work reeks havoc on a back that a couch does not help. Besides, as I've said before, PCF'ers are generous. Let them contribute.

...but never make it mandatory.
 

Schmendr1ck

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I think everyone going to a meet-up should do or contribute something, but tips or a financial contribution? I disagree.

Yes, cash is always appreciated, but so is beer, bourbon, and wine. Food contributions are always great. Ordering pizzas or a sub run helps out immensely if lunch was not planned. People gotta eat.

At longer, larger meet-ups, ice runs are needed because few people own ice machines capable of 20+ people. It's only a few bucks, but greatly helpful to a host who doesn't want to leave his house unattended - and whose car is probably blocked in.

Bottled water is often overlooked, but I've seen a case per day downed at some meets. Snacks will get nibbled on, but this is a "know the group" kind of contribution. At one meet-up Nutter Butters were all the rage, the next meet they went untouched leaving one more thing for the host to clean-up afterward. Which might not seem like a lot, but how many garbage cans does the host have? Meet-ups generate a lot of waste.

Speaking of waste, you can help a host greatly by knowing where their back-up supplies are. Trash bags need to be changed when the can is full. If you know ahead of time where cleaning supplies are, you wont need to distract the host who in tanking over a $300 pot with "Uh... where is your mop?"

Early arrival to help set-up or staying late to help tear down or clean up could be appreciated, or outright refused - check with your host.

The nice thing about a meet-up, is that nearly everyone there has hosted games. We all know the work involved in an evening of hosting, even if we are unaware that if is exponentially tougher when carried out for 3-4 continuous days.

But mandatory? I have skipped meet-ups where there was a fee for an Air BNB the host rented. I get it, if you live in a big city, you may not be able to host in your flat, but you are also asking people to buy airline tickets and perhaps even rent a car. Some drive for hours from their home. If you are staying in the Air BnB, I understand footing your share of the bill, but not everyone wants to sleep on a couch. Old age and hard work reeks havoc on a back that a couch does not help. Besides, as I've said before, PCF'ers are generous. Let them contribute.

...but never make it mandatory.
The takeaway is that if you go to a meetup, contribute something. It can be booze, food, labor/running errands, cash, or some combination of the above.

We need to keep our meetup hosts happy - we want them to keep hosting!
 

Jonesey07

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The takeaway is that if you go to a meetup, contribute something. It can be booze, food, labor/running errands, cash, or some combination of the above.

We need to keep our meetup hosts happy - we want them to keep hosting!

Or for some of us, all of the above!

Anything to take some burden off of the host!
 

CrazyEddie

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Tipping the host should almost be mandatory.
THey've given huge amounts of time and energy putting it together. Amazingly generous to open up their homes to people .
All the utilities, and unseen costs that go into a meet up I couldn't even begin to imagine.

Even if you are down, a little something helps.
If your up, consider it other peoples money and tip more.
I understand and agree with the sentiment behind your entire post, but I've highlighted one part that I think is important to unpack a bit further.

If tipping is mandatory, or even "almost mandatory", then it's not a tip. It's a fee.

I think that in social games, including meetups (I presume, I've never been to one), tips or other contributions can't begin to compensate the host for their financial expenses, let alone the personal effort they've expended to create a great environment for playing poker. But more to the point, the hosts wouldn't want to be compensated, and I don't think that anyone who's offering a tip is intending for it to be compensation.

What's wanted, both by the recipient and the giver, is recognition and appreciation. And that's what a tip or other offer of contribution represents. It's a way to say "Thank you". And in most cases, literally saying "thank you" would accomplish the same thing, and both the host and guest would be happy with the exchange. But since we're poker players, we're used to using money as an object that we manipulate during the course of our entertainment. We quantify literally every action we take in our games, and we do it not with points or scores but with cold hard cash. So it's very natural for us to want to embellish our gestures of thanks with some money. It's literally a token of appreciation. Not an amount that makes a real difference - when my host is spending a few hundred dollars on a game night, me dropping twenty bucks in the beer fund isn't keeping him from missing a mortgage payment - but rather a token amount. But that token amount is what matters, because what matters is the recognition and appreciation that it conveys.

Hosts want to be appreciated, and guests want to show their appreciation.
 
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