Router bit

rrobyrrroby

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I'm helping a friend to build his poker table (oval) and I'm about to use for the first time a router.
What bit do you recommend to use?
We have a 8mm which looks too big to me.

IMG_20210221_114331.jpg
 

Silver_Fiend

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I dont know exactly what you are planning on doing with the router, so its too difficult to provide you and answer. All my router use has been with hand-helds with roundover bits.
 

Omar65

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So I am not an expert by any means. But a router is going to do a lot more than cut a straight line, or curves in an oval or round table (ie in place of a jigsaw). It will certainly do those things, but will also allow the roundover edge as mentioned by @Silver_Fiend above (for the outside edge of the rail piece, a groove on the edge of a piece of wood if you wanted a decorative edge, etc etc.

I haven’t read through them but there are table build threads here that would probably be a good resource for you.
 

Trihonda

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I'm helping a friend to build his poker table (oval) and I'm about to use for the first time a router.
What bit do you recommend to use?
We have a 8mm which looks too big to me.

View attachment 640908

I use a 1/4” bit, so not sure how that translates to 8mm? But I strongly advocate the use of a router for most cuts, especially curves or sections that two pieces will be fit adjoining... the consistent spacing allows for better fitment, and easier upholstery. And a router provides a much smoother professional cut. and yes, I have a router that is used to round over the exposed edges. I’ve heard some debate not rounding over, but I’ve played many tables, and I can tell if the maker did t use a round over bit on the rail edge, for example.
 

Colquhoun

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Word of advice when using a straight cut bit like the one you have in the photo...don’t cut in one pass any deeper than the width of the bit. That means, if it’s a 1/4” wide bit, don’t cut deeper than 1/4” in one pass.
 

rrobyrrroby

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Thanks everyone for the replys.
In effect, my question was too generic.
I'm planning to use the router for the round cut. Not sure about the straight parts.
"Training" on a leftover plate I realized that a 8mm bit eats (of course!) a total of 16mm considering both edges.
This gap will never been completely filled with foam and fabric so the final result will simply not look good.
Is a 1/4” bit thin enough? The thickness of a jigsaw and circular saw it's even less than that..

Step3a.jpeg
 

Colquhoun

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I use:
Straight Bit - straight and curved cuts
Roundover Bit - Rounding edges, especially on rails
Flush Trim Bit - evening edges when two pieces of ply are stacked.

These are from Rockler and not cheap. There are less expensive ones available. Make sure the shank is the correct size.
Agreed about quality bits...they’re worth spending the extra money on. Stay away from HSS (high speed steel) and splurge for carbide.
 

Leonard

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Thanks everyone for the replys.
In effect, my question was too generic.
I'm planning to use the router for the round cut. Not sure about the straight parts.
"Training" on a leftover plate I realized that a 8mm bit eats (of course!) a total of 16mm considering both edges.
This gap will never been completely filled with foam and fabric so the final result will simply not look good.
Is a 1/4” bit thin enough? The thickness of a jigsaw and circular saw it's even less than that..
Where in your design is that going to matter?
Typically the playing surface and the lower layers of the rail will be cut from the same piece. A gap leaves room for the vinyl covering/speed cloth/foam.
 

Leonard

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My friend's table is planned to have a race track. So the gap I'm worried about is between the racetrack and the playing surface.
That’s an issue if you plan to cut the racetrack and the playing surface from the same piece of ply.
You will have to shim it under the speed cloth, use different pieces of wood, or not build with a racetrack. I’m not a fan of racetrack tables. They look good but play bad.
 

Thomacetti

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Too small and you will burn the bit more easily, too big and you have to remove too much material and go slow.

5-8mm is fine
 
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