Poker Room Lighting (2 Viewers)

Jeevansluck

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Hey All,

I tried to run some searches for threads about Poker Room Lighting. Came up empty. Maybe I don't know how to use the search feature.

As I prepare to launch my own home game in a couple weeks, I was wondering what kind of lighting do you all use to host?

My present poker room has 4 "recess" style led bulbs "soft white" or "3000k" with a wattage equivalent of 60W. These bulbs are effing terrible and even with 4 of them it's going to be embarassing to host with this shite. They are the "energy efficient" ones that warm up. Those will not cut it for me. I don't care how much it costs to run the lights of my poker room, It's once a month, I just want quality results.

So...I want to know what others are using?

5000k? 85w equivalent? 100w equivalent???

My room is about 12' x 18' with a 9' vaulted ceiling. I can give detailed pics upon request. Just PM me.

I haven't experimented yet. Figured I'd get a bit of feedback before wasting money on bulbs that won't do well.

The room is a darkish shade of green with white roof and white crown moulding.

I've got 4 total light sockets.

Any ideas or suggestions would be cool!
 

ATLarchip

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I can give you my 2¢ on what I’ve learned about lighting from the architecture design world.

Short answer: I recommend replacing your bulbs with LED 100w equivalent at 2700-3000K, with preferably your table directly under one of the can lights.

Long architect nerd version:
LEDs are measured in two main numbers, Lumens (brightness) and Kelvin (color temperature).

Regarding Lumens, a 60w equivalent LED will give off around 840 lumens. A 100w equivalent will give around 1600 lumens. Note that both are very energy efficient and do not actually pull 60-100 watts. That wattage equivalent is just so people have an idea when switching from incandescent light bulbs to an LED light bulb for brightness (as incandescent brightness was mostly measured off the watts). 60w (~840 lumens) is pretty low, generally good for a bedside table lamp when you’re winding down at night.

Regarding Kelvins (color temperature) the most readily available temps will be 2700, 3000, and 5000K in LEDs. The lower the number, the more yellow (warm) and the higher the number will be more blue (cool) color. Think of 2700 as your bedside lamp and 5000 as an office space lighting (fluorescent tube lighting). 5000 also mimics the natural daylight at noon, so it gives your body more energy as it thinks it’s daytime, as a 2700 is more like a sunset color. I recommend 3000 as the 5000 can be a bit harsh. I know you have 3000 in there now, but you’ll be amazed at the difference bumping up the Lumens (wattage equivalent) will make.

Long architect nerd version (regarding design and layout): The lighting you have in your room now is great for general lighting of the whole room, but you also need a task lighting (such as a hanging pendant light directly over your table). Think of your living room or home office, you might have can lights throughout to illuminate the whole space, but when you want to read a book, you turn on a lamp next to your favorite chair to get better direct task lighting. Same goes for a poker room design. General lighting so your guests can move around the room, but a task light when they’re at the table to help see the cards and to show off your chips.

Anyway just my thoughts. Sorry to make it so long.
 
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Irish

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When I redid my basement last year, I put these in:

20190803_112047.jpg


20190803_112115.jpg


I have 4 of them over my main table, the space is roughly 11'x12', they work great IMHO. Warm color and bright enough for people to easily see their cards without the sterile shop/office lighting level feel, dimmable and relatively inexpensive. Going 3k would be good but any higher than that would be too much IMHO.

I just put a bunch of LED shop lights in my workshop, they're 4k with 4500 lumen output, super bright like its daylight. Works great for that application but I think everyone would be wearing ballcaps and glasses for a poker game. :)

Obviously you can't 100% tell lighting from a picture online, but I posted several pics of the final setup in my basement build here:

https://www.pokerchipforum.com/threads/basement-poker-room-home-theater.31516/post-765146
 

Irish

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I can give you my 2¢ on what I’ve learned about lighting from the architecture design world.

Short answer: I recommend replacing your bulbs with LED 100w equivalent at 3000K, with preferably your table directly under one of the can lights.

Long architect nerd version:
LEDs are measured in two main numbers, Lumens (brightness) and Kelvin (color temperature).

Regarding Lumens, a 60w equivalent LED will give off around 840 lumens. A 100w equivalent will give around 1600 lumens. Note that both are very energy efficient and do not actually pull 60-100 watts. That wattage equivalent is just so people have an idea when switching from incandescent light bulbs to an LED light bulb for brightness (as incandescent brightness was mostly measured off the watts). 60w (~840 lumens) is pretty low, generally good for a bedside table lamp when you’re winding down at night.

Regarding Kelvins (color temperature) the most readily available temps will be 2700, 3000, and 5000K in LEDs. The lower the number, the more yellow (warm) and the higher the number will be more blue (cool) color. Think of 2700 as your bedside lamp and 5000 as an office space lighting (fluorescent tube lighting). 5000 also mimics the natural daylight at noon, so it gives your body more energy as it thinks it’s daytime, as a 2700 is more like a sunset color. I recommend 3000 as the 5000 can be a bit harsh. I know you have 3000 in there now, but you’ll be amazed at the difference bumping up the Lumens (wattage equivalent) will make.

Long architect nerd version (regarding design and layout): The lighting you have in your room now is great for general lighting of the whole room, but you also need a task lighting (such as a hanging pendant light directly over your table). Think of your living room or home office, you might have can lights throughout to illuminate the whole space, but when you want to read a book, you turn on a lamp next to your favorite chair to get better direct task lighting. Same goes for a poker room design. General lighting so your guests can move around the room, but a task light when they’re at the table to help see the cards and to show off your chips.

Anyway just my thoughts. Sorry to make it so long.

Great post!
 

Jeevansluck

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Epic feedback. Thanks alot. @Coyote thanks for the link!:tup:

@ATLarchip what a response. How could you apologize for delivering on what I asked for? Wow! Great read. Informative. Educational. Thanks very much.

@Irish excellent input. Seems dimensions of our respective poker spaces are close to the same. Just another amazing reply.

I'll be hitting the home Depot today. I'll buy 4 x 85W equivalent LED2700K. See how they work. It's a new wattage in between 60W and 100W. I'll also buy 4 x 100w equivalent LED2700K and I'll also buy 4 x 100W equivalent LED5000K to see the "office" effect.

I'll be sure to post my decision. I'll just have to return what I don't use. Shouldn't be a problem at Home Depot.

Thanks again for the timely responses. Unreal helpful!
 

Roll Tide Roll

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Depends on how “warm” you want the room to feel.
Smokey back room of a bar...2700
Old wood walled lodge...2700
Modern library...5000
Watchmaker factory...5000

The brighter the better if you buy dimmable (that don’t buzz).
Dimmers let you set the scene.

I would recommend a fixture directly above the table. This could be a can or two or a downlight like a dinning room.
 

allforcharity

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Don't overlook your design elements when searching for task lighting. You may remember this over my dining table:

P1110104.JPG


Copied from a Poul Henningsen 1958 design, known as the "artichoke lamp", an aluminum version. These are big, about 24" diameter. Available from Amazon.
(If you can find an original, they are about $15,000-$60,000 each, depending on size. You think poker chips are expensive?).
 

Rhodeman77

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My basement had all recessed lighting with these think frosted glass diffusers that did not put out much light at all. I used floor lamps at first to supplement them. Now I have replaced most of them with 13” LED panels. They are low profile which is great because my ceiling isn’t the tallest. They put out a lot of light.

Home Depot sells them in 2 packs for about $50. They are supposed to last up to 20 years or something crazy like that.

FAD6CA86-B4D8-46F7-AFE5-888B6C5FF7EB.jpeg
CB21D128-8773-48FE-8D46-9803CA03FCEB.jpeg
530973AF-B22B-4A10-9D3A-43C57F486A03.jpeg
 

T_Chan

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No reflectors?

No we decided to go with the exposed bulb look. We might add a glass or metal cage around the bulbs down the road but we really like how they look as is with the vintage motif. I installed a dimmer because on full brightness, it's a bit harsh. On a low setting, it has a very nice ambiance.

IMG_20190731_185548.jpg
 

jazzV3

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Another shortcut option for direct lighting on table is an arc lamp.

Quick and easy without having to install new fixture.
You can find them with pretty long arms to keep the base back from the table and height of the arc is comfortable to walk under.

Tip: get one with a baffle on the bottom of the shad to diffuse the light and prevent glare.

1564930402193.png
1564930524718.png
 

Jeevansluck

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So much awesomeness in all these replies, opinions and pictures...

I have recently exhausted cash reserves to buy chips and a T_Chan table (still in works).

So my budget was very tight. New fixtures and such were out of the question. It was a game of bulbs in the spots that I have to work with.

Someday...I'll buy a unique hanging fixture for directly over the tables like @AK Chip . Effing sick setup bro. That shit is dream worthy. Like a boys club you got there. So cool!

I've posted a few pics. I used FEIT brand 85W equivalent LED bulbs. The results are astounding. They brightened the room, the table, even my rugged T_Chan heavy duty birdcage came to life with the Rounders loaded inside.

I changed all 4 bulbs. They are 2700K or "soft white". They put out 1100lumens/bulb. LED type and I made sure to buy dimmable bulbs. I'll buy a dimmer switch down the road so that was good feedback thanks @T_Chan

Here is some lit poker room pr0n :
15649656507672679611633751744943.jpgIMG_20190804_173059.jpgIMG_20190804_173035.jpgIMG_20190804_173020.jpg

Thanks for all the feedback gents! For now, this will do. All in all, $60CDN spent. Not bad at all. I'll save up for any upgrades if the group isn't happy with it!
 
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