Opinions on Juego Ceramics?

Maximo

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https://www.amazon.co.uk/Juego-Cera...keywords=juego+ceramics&qid=1616265383&sr=8-1
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Hi all, has anyone had any experience with the above and if not, can tell me if these seem reasonably priced / quality? I have 200 Juego pro embossed (25's) as I got them cheap but need different denominations. I can't find the pro embossed anywhere so thought I might be able to cross these together.
Could anyone also explain what is meant by ceramics and how it differs from say clay, and if 'clay' chips with metal inserts are actually clay?

On a side note, the TCR sale on Sunday, as I'm from the UK, what would additional costs be like for shipping and import and if I wanted a set of say 300, how much would I be looking at spending?

Thanks, Max.
 

CrazyEddie

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All poker chips are made out of plastic, including the ones we call "clay" and "ceramic". There's many different types of plastic, though, which gives each type of poker chip its unique characteristics.

One feature which distinguishes ceramic chips from all others is that they're made out of a type of plastic that can be printed on directly using dye sublimation. Dye-sub is a printing method in which the ink is heated while in contact with the plastic; as a consequence, the ink is essentially embedded into the surface of the chip. Ceramic chips can be printed across their entire face and along the rolling edge with any design imaginable, and as a result ceramic chips are available in a wide variety of graphic designs. They have no label, inlay, or sticker that could be removed; the design is permanently bonded with the chip.

Clay chips can't be printed on directly. Their graphic designs are instead printed onto a round piece of laminated paper or plastic called an inlay, and then the inlay is pressed into the center of the chip while the chip is molded. This compression molding is what distinguishes clay chips from all others; all other chips are made using injection molding.

Chips with metal inserts are often called "slugged plastic"; they're made out of injection-molded plastic surrounding a metal slug. Instead of having a printed inlay that's pressed into the chip's surface during molding, they have a printed adhesive label that's stuck onto them after they've been molded. They come in two varieties - those sold to consumers on the mass market, and those sold to casinos. The former are cheap and low quality, the latter are expensive and high-quality, and generally aren't available at typical retail outlets. Neither one are clay chips (although, again, "clay" chips are plastic too).

Anyone can and everyone does call their chips "clay". There are no enforceable standards as to what constitutes a clay chip. However, what most people think of as a clay chip are the chips that casinos have been using for nearly a hundred years; these are compression-molded plastic as I described above. People sell slugged injection-molded plastic chips and call them "clay" in order to lead people into thinking they're similar to the ones you'll find in casinos, but in fact they're nothing like the clay chips casinos use at all.

Hope that answers some of your questions! I'm afraid I can't help with the others, but hopefully someone else will chime in. :)
 

Maximo

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All poker chips are made out of plastic, including the ones we call "clay" and "ceramic". There's many different types of plastic, though, which gives each type of poker chip its unique characteristics.

One feature which distinguishes ceramic chips from all others is that they're made out of a type of plastic that can be printed on directly using dye sublimation. Dye-sub is a printing method in which the ink is heated while in contact with the plastic; as a consequence, the ink is essentially embedded into the surface of the chip. Ceramic chips can be printed across their entire face and along the rolling edge with any design imaginable, and as a result ceramic chips are available in a wide variety of graphic designs. They have no label, inlay, or sticker that could be removed; the design is permanently bonded with the chip.

Clay chips can't be printed on directly. Their graphic designs are instead printed onto a round piece of laminated paper or plastic called an inlay, and then the inlay is pressed into the center of the chip while the chip is molded. This compression molding is what distinguishes clay chips from all others; all other chips are made using injection molding.

Chips with metal inserts are often called "slugged plastic"; they're made out of injection-molded plastic surrounding a metal slug. Instead of having a printed inlay that's pressed into the chip's surface during molding, they have a printed adhesive label that's stuck onto them after they've been molded. They come in two varieties - those sold to consumers on the mass market, and those sold to casinos. The former are cheap and low quality, the latter are expensive and high-quality, and generally aren't available at typical retail outlets. Neither one are clay chips (although, again, "clay" chips are plastic too).

Anyone can and everyone does call their chips "clay". There are no enforceable standards as to what constitutes a clay chip. However, what most people think of as a clay chip are the chips that casinos have been using for nearly a hundred years; these are compression-molded plastic as I described above. People sell slugged injection-molded plastic chips and call them "clay" in order to lead people into thinking they're similar to the ones you'll find in casinos, but in fact they're nothing like the clay chips casinos use at all.

Hope that answers some of your questions! I'm afraid I can't help with the others, but hopefully someone else will chime in. :)
Wow, really appreciate the information, thanks for the help!

Thanks but those are the pro embossed I already have, I'm looking for advise on the ceramics Juego have.
 

MrWitti

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Without doubt there are better and worse ceramics out there. Our poker club used cheap china ceramics and then switched to sunfly. The difference in wear was noticeable... after 3 years of use 6 days a week, 50 weeks a year. If its for your homegame the only quality that matters is the print quality. If you like the design, you most likely have to take the risk, order one set and check it out.
I like the juego embossed, but this is a completely different product, the only thing they share is the name.
 

Maximo

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Without doubt there are better and worse ceramics out there. Our poker club used cheap china ceramics and then switched to sunfly. The difference in wear was noticeable... after 3 years of use 6 days a week, 50 weeks a year. If its for your homegame the only quality that matters is the print quality. If you like the design, you most likely have to take the risk, order one set and check it out.
I like the juego embossed, but this is a completely different product, the only thing they share is the name.
I liked your review of the Pro Embossed and actually contributed towards me buying them lol. As you're European, what kind of chips stand out to you as a good buy, or as a good vendor? I'm having difficulty finding decent chips outside of the US.

Thanks.
 

MrWitti

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I think as most of us went through a transition from what we liked when we started to where we are now. But most will probably end with clay chips such as paulson, bcc, asm or trk.
In my opinion ceramics are a solid bang for the buck. And you might get some interesting offers here as people offen „grow“ out of them (Not in a negativ way)

One answer for sure is, get samples.

Maybe some UK chippers can guide you better to places in your area.
 

Kid_Eastwood

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Our poker club used cheap china ceramics and then switched to sunfly. The difference in wear was noticeable... after 3 years of use 6 days a week, 50 weeks a year.

Can you give more info on this ?
How the SF look after 3 years ? How the cheap China looked ?
Also, which SF are you referring to ? PolyChrom, PolyClay or PolyInno ?
 

MrWitti

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Polychrom chips. The sunfly showed some wear in colors. Not as extrem as the used chipcos u see sometimes. But hardly any dammage to the chip itself. The cheap china ceramics had tons of knicks. Unfortunately dont have pictures.
 
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