Long time reader, first time poker chip murderer having some trouble

JMC9389

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So I finally got thr courage to get a hobby knife set and murder some Le Cove chips. The first one on the right went swimmingly, but the others I'm having lots of trouble getting the plastic inlay cover off with a #18 blade.

I'm having way more trouble with these than the textured inlay chips I practiced on.

The inlay covers are smooth and not textured on these. Any tips that would help are appreciated!

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allforcharity

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Getting the plastic laminate off should be one of the easiest parts. I do the "pie slice" method.

Take your blade, start at the very center. Make a straight cut out to the inlay perimeter.

Rotate the chip about 45 degrees. Start again at the center and make a straight cut out to the inlay perimeter, BUT NOT ALL THE WAY. 80% of the distance to the perimeter.

Dig underneath the tip of the pie to pry up a sliver of laminate. Then use needle-nose pliers to free the rest of the pie, but still leave the plastic connected by the little bit that wasn't cut all the way. Re-orient your pliers to grab from that connection piece, and use a rolling motion to pull on it while rotating the chip in your other hand.
 

JMC9389

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Getting the plastic laminate off should be one of the easiest parts. I do the "pie slice" method.

Take your blade, start at the very center. Make a straight cut out to the inlay perimeter.

Rotate the chip about 45 degrees. Start again at the center and make a straight cut out to the inlay perimeter, BUT NOT ALL THE WAY. 80% of the distance to the perimeter.

Dig underneath the tip of the pie to pry up a sliver of laminate. Then use needle-nose pliers to free the rest of the pie, but still leave the plastic connected by the little bit that wasn't cut all the way. Re-orient your pliers to grab from that connection piece, and use a rolling motion to pull on it while rotating the chip in your other hand.
I don't know how it could be because I'm actually following your instructional videos that you posted last year to a "T". It's like the blade isn't sharp enough after I practiced on 5 old textured inlaid chips that went really smoothly. Now the blade I feel is barely penetrating the plastic cover. Am I not exerting enough of pressure or did I just get really shitty knives/blades that get dull after 15 cuts?
 

allforcharity

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I don't know how it could be because I'm actually following your instructional videos that you posted last year to a "T". It's like the blade isn't sharp enough after I practiced on 5 old textured inlaid chips that went really smoothly. Now the blade I feel is barely penetrating the plastic cover. Am I not exerting enough of pressure or did I just get really shitty knives/blades that get dull after 15 cuts?

Hold on a mo. Is #18 a chisel blade? You need to use a #2 or something that has an angle.
 

JMC9389

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Hold on a mo. Is #18 a chisel blade? You need to use a #2 or something that has an angle.
Nah, the 18 blade I'm using to chistle off the scraps of paper label after applying nail polish removal.

I think the default blade on the factory stencil is thr #2 blade.
 

allforcharity

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Nah, the 18 blade I'm using to chistle off the scraps of paper label after applying nail polish removal.

I think the default blade on the factory stencil is thr #2 blade.

You probably just need to apply a little more pressure. I don't worry too much about the initial cuts. Even if you end up slicing a bit into the chip face, you'd never know it was there once you put your new laminated sticker on top. You'd have to seriously gouge your chip face before you can see any damage through the sticker.
 

JMC9389

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Nah, the 18 blade I'm using to chistle off the scraps of paper label after applying nail polish removal.

I think the default blade on the factory stencil is thr #2 blade.
This is what I was using. Do any of the other blades pictured in the kit work better for this?
 

BGinGA

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Le Coves are a lot more scarce than Casino de Mexico chips (lesser supply). Most denominations are arguably nicer-looking too, resulting in higher demand.

Not making a statement re: chip murder of either one; just stating facts.
 

RichMahogany

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I use a box cutter to murder chips.

Holding the blade at an angle, I always start at the outer edge of the inlay and cut inward till about halfway across. Then I use the box cutter to lift the cut portion away from the chip base and use the needle nose pliers on my Leatherman to remove the inlay from the chip.

I found that when I tried the pie cut method it was more work than one simple cut. I also always start from the outside in to minimize the damage to the chip face when my hand slips, which it does a lot. It also allows me to be less accurate with the blade and causes the inlay cover to come off easier IMLE.

The key is to get the cut right the first time. Probably took about 10 chips before I found my method and it worked well for me.
 

JMC9389

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I don't think that's its going to be worth my time and multiple cuts and gashes to my fingers.

I've reached out to a couple of folks I know can do this, but PM me if you'd be willing to help me out!
 

WhiteMamba1646

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I make a pie cut starting from the outside of the chip to the center. That way u dont NIC the edge of the chip were the inlay begins and chip begins. I use an Mlife SK-5 High Carbon Steel Exacto Knife, they work great and u can get em on amazon for cheap. Once you get the pie cut done you can slide the edge of the knife underneath and pop it up on the corner and then use pliers to peel the rest off. Pretty simple process just takes some practice
 

Josh Kifer

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Do you do textured, inlaid chips? The horror...
I have. It works, just requires some cleanup afterwords. Not nearly as clean as hand Murdering tho. V
 

JMC9389

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Honestly, for me I think it's going to be worth the price for the convenience and keeping all of my fingers.

My people will be in touch with your people @Josh Kifer
 

Josh Kifer

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Honestly, for me I think it's going to be worth the price for the convenience and keeping all of my fingers.

My people will be in touch with your people @Josh Kifer
PM me, and we can chat. I'm pretty slammed right now, but I'll tell ya the positives and negatives
 
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