Is there room for a new clay chip manufacturer in NA or EU? (1 Viewer)

Carnth

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Hello!
I'm mostly new around here. I've been getting familiar with the various chips and what they are made of.
The overwhelming preference seems to be clay. Especially Paulson chips, of which I'm also a huge fan.

After reading further, Paulson stopped selling to the common folk long long ago. So they're hard to get unless you can get those original fantasy chips, or get cancelled casino chips, or get chips from a closed casino. Or, be a casino.

What about other clay chip manufacturers?

There's Classic Poker Chips (CPC) where you can get plenty of their own pre-made chips or custom order your own sweet sweet set (most likely in a group buy).

And there's China Clay. Which after reading several forum posts may not be actual clay (maybe they are, I'm still confused about them).

But.... That's it? There's no other options? That sounds unbelievable.

I'm surprised that there isn't another company out there. Is there just not enough demand? Is chip manufacturing that cost prohibitive that a new company wouldn't be able to turn a profit? Or is something nefarious happening--like GPI muscling out any competition?

Please share your thoughts.
 

ParrotheadMZ

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That’s pretty much it.

A few things.
1) the cost of the start up with the expensive equipment. Guessing 300-500k
2) molds.... you have to design a mold that people like Or several for that matter and that’s expensive.
3) this is the biggy... the experience to put out a quality chip. That must take a long time to master. When Red bought out AMC before it became CPC , red messed up a lot of peoples chips.... so bad he sold the company back to them iirc.
I may have missed a few points but it’s expensive art with a small profit margin I do believe to start from scratch.
Just my thoughts.
 

CrazyEddie

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Hello!
I'm mostly new around here.
Welcome to the forum! Hide your wallet. :)

I've been getting familiar with the various chips and what they are made of.
You might get some value from reading these three posts: here, here, and here.

After reading further, Paulson stopped selling to the common folk long long ago. So they're hard to get unless you can get those original fantasy chips, or get cancelled casino chips, or get chips from a closed casino. Or, be a casino.
That's basically correct. Lots and lots of Paulsons have made their way onto the third-party market, i.e. us, and we trade them mostly in the PCF Classifieds section. Every now and then a new large horde of Paulsons is discovered or otherwise made available, so there's plenty to choose from... but demand continues to outstrip supply, alas.

What about other clay chip manufacturers?

There's Classic Poker Chips (CPC) where you can get plenty of their own pre-made chips or custom order your own sweet sweet set (most likely in a group buy).

And there's China Clay. Which after reading several forum posts may not be actual clay (maybe they are, I'm still confused about them).

But.... That's it? There's no other options? That sounds unbelievable.

That is it. There's no other options. There used to be, but one by one those other options have become closed to us. Here's the sad story, in short:
There have been only a handful of compression-molded clay chip manufacturers: The United States Playing Card Company (USPCC), The Burt Company which became Atlantic Standard Molding (ASM) which became American Standard Molding (also ASM) which became Classic Poker Chips (CPC), TR King (TRK), Paulson, and The Blue Chip Company (BCC), plus three others not worth mentioning here. Paulson eventually became Gaming Partners, Inc (GPI). Paulson, BCC, Bud Jones, and B&G are all now part of GPI. USPCC stopped making poker chips in the 1940s. TRK shut down when the owner retired.

That means that today there are only two sources of new clay poker chips: GPI and Classic Poker Chips. But GPI only sells to casinos, which means that if you want new clay chips, the only source is Classic Poker Chips. CPC carries a few lines of stock designs, and they have one reseller - Key West - who carries and sells their own stock design. But besides their stock designs, CPC's main line of business is made-to-order custom casino-grade clay poker chips.

Also, china clays are definitely not actual clay (neither are clays, but that's a different topic - see the posts above for details). China clays are made to be kinda sorta similar to clays, and they're not bad, but they're definitely not the same.

I'm surprised that there isn't another company out there. Is there just not enough demand? Is chip manufacturing that cost prohibitive that a new company wouldn't be able to turn a profit? Or is something nefarious happening--like GPI muscling out any competition?

Please share your thoughts.
Clay chips are compression-molded. This sets them apart from all the other options, which are all injection-molded. The compression-molding process creates a chip with characteristics that are difficult to counterfeit; it also makes them feel quite a bit nicer, in most people's subjective assessments. However, the compression molding process is also significantly more expensive - it requires a good bit of capital investment, a good bit of specialized technical expertise, and a lot of manual labor. Injection molding is, relatively speaking, quite a bit less expensive.

There actually has been, and continues to be, quite a bit of competition and market turnover in the poker chip business. There's been a number of innovations over the years. In the mass market, around twenty years ago there was basically just dice chips; now the variety of chips you can get from, say, Amazon is staggering, with substantial quality improvements as well. The enthusiast market - i.e. people like us - have been well-served by a large number of new, high-quality chips produced by companies like PGI and Apache; these are the ones we generally call china clays.

The only segment of the chip market that's been stagnant or declining is casino clays. And the only people who care about that decline are us enthusiasts; the casinos don't mind, because GPI is still doing just fine and can sell them all the chips they need, and the mass market doesn't mind because they've got plenty of cheap chips that suit their needs just fine.

----

So. Is there room for a new clay manufacturer?

There absolutely is room. All you have to do is look at the lead times at Classic Poker Chips. Six to nine months, even longer in some cases. If someone else could enter that space they would have plenty of business; they'd take some away from CPC but also increase the market overall by reducing lead times, and the market for high-quality home game poker chips seems like it's only going to increase, at least for the next few years.

But is it feasible? Would a new entrant be viable?

For the casino market, GPI has that pretty well locked down. They're the only provider of clay chips, which are still preferred by most casinos. They face some degree of competition in the casino plastics and casino ceramics from Abbiati and Matsui, but with their Bud Jones and Bourgogne et Grasset brands they're still the market leaders in those segments. A new venture certainly could try to compete with them, but it would definitely be an uphill battle. Not saying it can't be done, but I suspect it would take a market-disrupting innovation to gain ground. Note that once upon a time Bud Jones created just such a disruption by developing casino-quality injection-molded plastic chips, and then later Chipco did it again by creating ceramics. It could certainly happen again.

What about the home market, then?

CPC has a much smaller-scale operation than GPI. But even at that, they have a lot of equipment and operational know-how that they've accumulated and preserved across literally a century. It's safe to say that nobody is going to easily or cheaply duplicate what CPC is doing right now.

But there's more than one way to skin a cat. All the clay chip manufacturers have made chips more-or-less the same way, but the details have been dramatically different. There's nothing that says that a new entrant in the compression-molded clay chip market segment would have to use the same sorts of equipment, materials, and processes that CPC or GPI use. There's room for a market-disrupting innovation.

But so far that innovation hasn't appeared. Or rather, it has, but it gave us china clays - which are a pretty reasonable economic substitute, and have been an absolute boon to chip enthusiasts like us, not to mention a market success - but they're just not quite the same.

Making something that's enough like clays to satisfy those of us who want clays is not impossible, and might not even be infeasible... but it's not going to be cheap or easy. Perhaps someone with the necessary entrepreneurial spirit (and the necessary financial backing) will step up to the plate in the near future.

Fingers crossed.
 

Venturalvn

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There's Classic Poker Chips (CPC) where you can get plenty of their own pre-made chips or custom order your own sweet sweet set (most likely in a group buy).
Not sure what this means - most likely in a group buy. CPC doesn't have price breaks for quantity, so they are actually useless for group buys. They're the only option for custom clays in the home market.
 

Carnth

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Welcome to the forum! Hide your wallet. :)
Too late. I already pulled the trigger on a set (and an additional rack) of Jack Cincy from TheChipRoom.

Thank you very much for your comprehensive answers.
I saw that you quoted yourself and through clicking on your quoted post, found your other post... which turned out to be a three-part adventure in chip history with photos and everything! :love: Your posted was so detailed and enlightening.
Again, thank you.

It is too bad that there is no other alternative, but now I understand that "thems the breaks" as it stands today.

I wonder if China clays would be able to take custom orders like CPC does. Or, is it because they only make "default sets" that they are cheaper (as well as the lower quality)?
 

BGinGA

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A few years back, an upstart German chip company showed some early promise with some very nice debossed mold chips with recess/labels that were similar to ceramics, but very sharp-edged and unique in both sound and feel. Stralka, maybe? Initially only made solids, then disappeared a few months later. Wonder what happened to the equipment....
 
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Welcome to the forum! Hide your wallet. :)


You might get some value from reading these three posts: here, here, and here.


That's basically correct. Lots and lots of Paulsons have made their way onto the third-party market, i.e. us, and we trade them mostly in the PCF Classifieds section. Every now and then a new large horde of Paulsons is discovered or otherwise made available, so there's plenty to choose from... but demand continues to outstrip supply, alas.



That is it. There's no other options. There used to be, but one by one those other options have become closed to us. Here's the sad story, in short:


Also, china clays are definitely not actual clay (neither are clays, but that's a different topic - see the posts above for details). China clays are made to be kinda sorta similar to clays, and they're not bad, but they're definitely not the same.


Clay chips are compression-molded. This sets them apart from all the other options, which are all injection-molded. The compression-molding process creates a chip with characteristics that are difficult to counterfeit; it also makes them feel quite a bit nicer, in most people's subjective assessments. However, the compression molding process is also significantly more expensive - it requires a good bit of capital investment, a good bit of specialized technical expertise, and a lot of manual labor. Injection molding is, relatively speaking, quite a bit less expensive.

There actually has been, and continues to be, quite a bit of competition and market turnover in the poker chip business. There's been a number of innovations over the years. In the mass market, around twenty years ago there was basically just dice chips; now the variety of chips you can get from, say, Amazon is staggering, with substantial quality improvements as well. The enthusiast market - i.e. people like us - have been well-served by a large number of new, high-quality chips produced by companies like PGI and Apache; these are the ones we generally call china clays.

The only segment of the chip market that's been stagnant or declining is casino clays. And the only people who care about that decline are us enthusiasts; the casinos don't mind, because GPI is still doing just fine and can sell them all the chips they need, and the mass market doesn't mind because they've got plenty of cheap chips that suit their needs just fine.

----

So. Is there room for a new clay manufacturer?

There absolutely is room. All you have to do is look at the lead times at Classic Poker Chips. Six to nine months, even longer in some cases. If someone else could enter that space they would have plenty of business; they'd take some away from CPC but also increase the market overall by reducing lead times, and the market for high-quality home game poker chips seems like it's only going to increase, at least for the next few years.

But is it feasible? Would a new entrant be viable?

For the casino market, GPI has that pretty well locked down. They're the only provider of clay chips, which are still preferred by most casinos. They face some degree of competition in the casino plastics and casino ceramics from Abbiati and Matsui, but with their Bud Jones and Bourgogne et Grasset brands they're still the market leaders in those segments. A new venture certainly could try to compete with them, but it would definitely be an uphill battle. Not saying it can't be done, but I suspect it would take a market-disrupting innovation to gain ground. Note that once upon a time Bud Jones created just such a disruption by developing casino-quality injection-molded plastic chips, and then later Chipco did it again by creating ceramics. It could certainly happen again.

What about the home market, then?

CPC has a much smaller-scale operation than GPI. But even at that, they have a lot of equipment and operational know-how that they've accumulated and preserved across literally a century. It's safe to say that nobody is going to easily or cheaply duplicate what CPC is doing right now.

But there's more than one way to skin a cat. All the clay chip manufacturers have made chips more-or-less the same way, but the details have been dramatically different. There's nothing that says that a new entrant in the compression-molded clay chip market segment would have to use the same sorts of equipment, materials, and processes that CPC or GPI use. There's room for a market-disrupting innovation.

But so far that innovation hasn't appeared. Or rather, it has, but it gave us china clays - which are a pretty reasonable economic substitute, and have been an absolute boon to chip enthusiasts like us, not to mention a market success - but they're just not quite the same.

Making something that's enough like clays to satisfy those of us who want clays is not impossible, and might not even be infeasible... but it's not going to be cheap or easy. Perhaps someone with the necessary entrepreneurial spirit (and the necessary financial backing) will step up to the plate in the near future.

Fingers crossed.
What a post :tup:
 

surfik

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A few years back, an upstart German chip company showed some early promise with some very nice debossed mold chips with recess/labels that were similar to ceramics, but very sharp-edged and unique in both sound and feel. Stralka, maybe? Initially only made solids, then disappeared a few months later. Wonder what happened to the equipment....
That's the problem, because of material they used molds and machines were worn out.
Stralka chips are really nice (still have my sample set) but they were expensive in production.
I tried to contact the with no avail...
 

CrazyEddie

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Stralka chips are on my "gotta get a sample someday" list - so little information about them, so tantalizing...
 

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I'm fully invested in @Strasser :) and eager to see what comes next. Keeping an eye on @Grandmasturkey as well... Have great hopes for these folks.

If anyone else can make new clay chips, I'm rooting for you along with everyone else on the forum. "Chips" seems like a market sector that could definitely use more competition to shake things up.
 
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You guys must hate me if I say that I fancy B&G chips over Clay Paulson American chips. They’re sound is just very clacking and they feel nice and soft, I like that aspect when I play a game
 

surfik

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You guys must hate me if I say that I fancy B&G chips over Clay Paulson American chips. They’re sound is just very clacking and they feel nice and soft, I like that aspect when I play a game
Not at all... I played with BG chips in Olimpic Casino in Warsaw... Great feel, its the shame they are closed
 

Carnth

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You guys must hate me if I say that I fancy B&G chips over Clay Paulson American chips.
I haven't been here very long, but from what I gathered on many of the posts that I've read, is that most people seem to prefer Paulson. They are more talked about. There are more classifieds trading them.
But, I could be wrong. I didn't sit down and actually count the number of posts for each brand. It just seems that way.

But each of us can love whatever we like. This forum celebrates all the differences. So, no. No one hates you for liking B&G chips.

In fact, I think most people like whatever chips they used for the first time they really sat down and played poker seriously.
That nostalgia of "I remember the first time I played... the seats with a few tears in it, and the chips in my hands...."
I'm fact, I think that would make for a great forum post.
 

CrazyEddie

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I wonder if China clays would be able to take custom orders like CPC does. Or, is it because they only make "default sets" that they are cheaper (as well as the lower quality)?
There's not much that you can customize about china clays. They're injection molded, which means that the shapes they come in are fixed, determined by the mold. For example, take a look at this Majestic brown blank:

majestic-poker-chip-brown.jpg


Every Majestic brown blank looks exactly like this one, right down to the exact same minor "imperfection" in the spots:

1632329052511.png


Those imperfections are deliberate, and they're present in the mold. They're there to make the chips look more like real clays, which have similar imperfections in each chip, but in clays the imperfections are due to compression molding being a largely manual process, and the imperfections are different from chip to chip. Take a close look and you'll see that none of these nine chips are exactly identical:

024-jpg.328130


Because clay chips are made by hand (to some degree), Paulson and CPC can customize the spot designs to their customers' satisfaction. But because the spots on a china clay are part of the mold, they can't be altered without creating an entirely new mold, which is expensive.

That means that the customization on china clays, or any other injection-molded chip, are pretty much limited to the decal. You can get injection-molded chips with any design you'd like printed on a decal and glued onto the center recess, but for the main body of the chip you're restricted to what was originally produced at the factory. Now, it is in fact possible to use a single injection mold to produce multiple different chips just by changing the color of the plastics used. For example, that's how these Showdowns were made:

sd2.jpg
sd8.jpg
sd11.jpg


They used the same mold, but different colors (and different decals).

However, that's not going to be something you can get as a custom option. The logistics make it infeasible. These chips are made in huge batches at the factory, then shipped to distributors and retailers. So the only colors you can hope to buy are the ones that the producer (for example, Apache) ordered from the manufacturer. Apache would have no good way to take an order from, say, you, and then have the factory make a few hundred chips using a custom set of colors that you requested.

For a lot of people, though, just customizing the decal is good enough! Lots of PCF members have gotten china clay sets and then relabeled them with their own labels. Here's a few examples using the Spirit Mold china clays:
These are awesome chips, but they're just not the same as custom-made clays, which is why CPC is running a nine-month backlog for chips that are ten times the price.
 

upNdown

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You guys must hate me if I say that I fancy B&G chips over Clay Paulson American chips. They’re sound is just very clacking and they feel nice and soft, I like that aspect when I play a game
No hate. From what I can tell, most European casinos use plastics, right? So it’s not surprising that plastics would seem like top shelf to you.
In America, most casinos use Paulson clays, so that’s what seems best to me.
Maybe we agree that ceramics are second best.
 

Moxie Mike

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Welcome to the forum! Hide your wallet. :)


You might get some value from reading these three posts: here, here, and here.


That's basically correct. Lots and lots of Paulsons have made their way onto the third-party market, i.e. us, and we trade them mostly in the PCF Classifieds section. Every now and then a new large horde of Paulsons is discovered or otherwise made available, so there's plenty to choose from... but demand continues to outstrip supply, alas.



That is it. There's no other options. There used to be, but one by one those other options have become closed to us. Here's the sad story, in short:


Also, china clays are definitely not actual clay (neither are clays, but that's a different topic - see the posts above for details). China clays are made to be kinda sorta similar to clays, and they're not bad, but they're definitely not the same.


Clay chips are compression-molded. This sets them apart from all the other options, which are all injection-molded. The compression-molding process creates a chip with characteristics that are difficult to counterfeit; it also makes them feel quite a bit nicer, in most people's subjective assessments. However, the compression molding process is also significantly more expensive - it requires a good bit of capital investment, a good bit of specialized technical expertise, and a lot of manual labor. Injection molding is, relatively speaking, quite a bit less expensive.

There actually has been, and continues to be, quite a bit of competition and market turnover in the poker chip business. There's been a number of innovations over the years. In the mass market, around twenty years ago there was basically just dice chips; now the variety of chips you can get from, say, Amazon is staggering, with substantial quality improvements as well. The enthusiast market - i.e. people like us - have been well-served by a large number of new, high-quality chips produced by companies like PGI and Apache; these are the ones we generally call china clays.

The only segment of the chip market that's been stagnant or declining is casino clays. And the only people who care about that decline are us enthusiasts; the casinos don't mind, because GPI is still doing just fine and can sell them all the chips they need, and the mass market doesn't mind because they've got plenty of cheap chips that suit their needs just fine.

----

So. Is there room for a new clay manufacturer?

There absolutely is room. All you have to do is look at the lead times at Classic Poker Chips. Six to nine months, even longer in some cases. If someone else could enter that space they would have plenty of business; they'd take some away from CPC but also increase the market overall by reducing lead times, and the market for high-quality home game poker chips seems like it's only going to increase, at least for the next few years.

But is it feasible? Would a new entrant be viable?

For the casino market, GPI has that pretty well locked down. They're the only provider of clay chips, which are still preferred by most casinos. They face some degree of competition in the casino plastics and casino ceramics from Abbiati and Matsui, but with their Bud Jones and Bourgogne et Grasset brands they're still the market leaders in those segments. A new venture certainly could try to compete with them, but it would definitely be an uphill battle. Not saying it can't be done, but I suspect it would take a market-disrupting innovation to gain ground. Note that once upon a time Bud Jones created just such a disruption by developing casino-quality injection-molded plastic chips, and then later Chipco did it again by creating ceramics. It could certainly happen again.

What about the home market, then?

CPC has a much smaller-scale operation than GPI. But even at that, they have a lot of equipment and operational know-how that they've accumulated and preserved across literally a century. It's safe to say that nobody is going to easily or cheaply duplicate what CPC is doing right now.

But there's more than one way to skin a cat. All the clay chip manufacturers have made chips more-or-less the same way, but the details have been dramatically different. There's nothing that says that a new entrant in the compression-molded clay chip market segment would have to use the same sorts of equipment, materials, and processes that CPC or GPI use. There's room for a market-disrupting innovation.

But so far that innovation hasn't appeared. Or rather, it has, but it gave us china clays - which are a pretty reasonable economic substitute, and have been an absolute boon to chip enthusiasts like us, not to mention a market success - but they're just not quite the same.

Making something that's enough like clays to satisfy those of us who want clays is not impossible, and might not even be infeasible... but it's not going to be cheap or easy. Perhaps someone with the necessary entrepreneurial spirit (and the necessary financial backing) will step up to the plate in the near future.

Fingers crossed.
Fantastic write-up sir.

I disagree with a few of your points - primarily related to the size of the market. But rather than line-item where I have a different opinion, I'd like to share a little research I did 3 years ago when I was briefly a site vendor.

In 2018, I reviewed some data from Ebay completed listings as part of my market analysis.

Sold Ebay listings containing the keyword 'poker chip' (851 total over a 30 day period) (including small quantity purchases):
  • 602 were under $50; of those, 356 were 'new' and majority included a case.
  • 30 transactions between $200 and $300 in last 30 days
  • 100 transactions between $100 and $200 in last 30 days
  • 106 transactions between $50 and $100 in last 30 days
  • 10 transactions between $300 and $500 in last 30 days
  • 17 transactions over $500 in last 30 days
82% of the transactions were under $100 and only about 3% were over $300. What this tells me is that while poker's popularity is strong, the poker chip market is primarily comprised of consumers who don't want to spend a lot of money on their equipment. Obviously, Ebay isn't the only source of information, but the best selling products on Amazon are also similar in price point.

So the market for high-end chips is smaller than most people would realize. Supporting this, there are only about 8,000 members on PCF. It's reasonable to assume that most 'chippers' in the world are on this forum. And even then not all of us are the type to spend CPC-type money on our equipment.

So at this point, the only way a company could enter this market profitably would be to create a process that would result in a product that is equal to or greater in quality to that of CPC that are also 100% customizable AND at a significantly lower price point. Achieving this level of disruption would require significant capital investment to see if it's even possible - and to do so just to serve a very small segment of a niche market is not smart business.
 

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An excellent point! I certainly respect anyone who's actually done some market research.

Worth noting that CPC itself is, per some comments David Spragg has made, basically a labor of love to keep the hobby afloat that makes enough money to keep the lights on and the presses running.
 
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No hate. From what I can tell, most European casinos use plastics, right? So it’s not surprising that plastics would seem like top shelf to you.
In America, most casinos use Paulson clays, so that’s what seems best to me.
Maybe we agree that ceramics are second best.
All casinos I’ve been trough here in Europe use B&G for chips and plaques. When B&G’s are in used condition, they tend to handle better than new ones. The hard finish that came out of the factory, disappears thus creating a soft chip that sounds very good and less slick. Their plaques, are without of a doubt highest quality plaque you can put your hands on. Their chips and plaques are a benchmark product. I would not be surprised if these cost the casinos more than Paulsons.
 

mipevi

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When B&G’s are in used condition, they tend to handle better than new ones. The hard finish that came out of the factory, disappears thus creating a soft chip that sounds very good and less slick. Their plaques, are without of a doubt highest quality plaque you can put your hands on.
+1

I would not be surprised if these cost the casinos more than Paulsons.
Yeah, high end plastic (non-budget line) chips from BG, BJ, etc. are more expensive to the casinos than Paulsons. And the plaques cost much more.
 

upNdown

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All casinos I’ve been trough here in Europe use B&G for chips and plaques. When B&G’s are in used condition, they tend to handle better than new ones. The hard finish that came out of the factory, disappears thus creating a soft chip that sounds very good and less slick. Their plaques, are without of a doubt highest quality plaque you can put your hands on. Their chips and plaques are a benchmark product. I would not be surprised if these cost the casinos more than Paulsons.
I’d like to check out a B&G plaque, because I have a hard time imagining anything is better than a Matsui plaque.
 
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I’d like to check out a B&G plaque, because I have a hard time imagining anything is better than a Matsui plaque.
I’ve once felt a Matsui plaque, it was a promotion plaque. I can tell you right away, matsui don’t stand a chance against B&G unless it’s really taken the cost into consideration and the personal preference, which is fine because in the end what’s best in your eyes, it’s the best. That’s the thing that matters, however B&G with its real mother of pearl, and lunettes and security options etc, is unbeatable. I actually read a article today about B&G and they’re currency, turns out their plaque is quite a secret product and their formula is very very hard to replicate and has a unique feel.
Matsui plaques are quite good too, we can’t deny that however, B&G is really on a other level (IMO)
 

CrazyEddie

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I’d like to check out a B&G plaque, because I have a hard time imagining anything is better than a Matsui plaque.
To a certain degree it's a matter of preference, given the different body styles - Matsuis are smooth and featureless and thicker, B&G are molded and thinner. But having held them both, I put the B&Gs well ahead of the Matsuis.

There's plenty of B&G plaques on ebay (salvaged from casinos), but they're quite pricey. I bought up the cheap ones a few weeks ago.

Edit: .. and that's before getting into the design features that @scoobycheesydoooo mentioned; B&G have some fancy options that Matsui doesn't.
 
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B&G have some fancy options that Matsui doesn't.
I don’t think it’s B&G wanting to be fancy, to stand out. But I know what you mean. It’s all functional, B&G (GPI) knows that the casinos trust them the most for producing their currency and protecting them with all kinds of security options, all options in a plaque or chip are functional and are there for a reason,
It’s them simply providing the casinos with the best security while still having a aesthetically pleasing product that is easy to handle and distinguish. It’s the perfect cocktail, and GPI does that perfectly with each line of currency they offer, Paulson, BJ etc. Matsui is a good company that’s a more economic choice for a casino, and it’s product are high quality as well. I don’t think their plaques are cheap, they are cheaper than B&G (for sure) but to us, I think they are still expensive to buy in quantities. They have plenty of options as well, it’s just that the quality of materials and options don’t quite match the B&G’s, if it where you have would seen more matsui plaques at casinos than B&G, all around the globe. Which is really a obvious not in this case. (if memory serves my correctly, I still haven’t seen a matsui cash plaque in casino here in EU)
 

facinfears217

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Well let’s not forget matsui was on verge of having a custom M mold clay chip!!! That looked fantastic. Now if gpi golf involved or someone else idk story be behind it. But they had it for a small time on the site !!!
 
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