Help with Stud dealing irregularities

Leonard

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Roberts Rules of Poker said:
If the dealer burns and deals one or more cards before a round of betting has been completed, the card(s) must be eliminated from play. After the betting for that round is completed, an additional card for each remaining player still active in the hand is also eliminated from play (to later deal the same cards to the players who would have received them without the error). After that round of betting has concluded, the dealer burns a card and play resumes. The removed cards are held off to the side in the event the dealer runs out of cards. If the prematurely dealt card is the final downcard and has been looked at or intermingled with the player's other holecards, the player must keep the card, and on sixth street betting may not bet or raise (because the player now has all seven cards).

Trying to determine the correct method of dealing with a prematurely exposed card in Stud Poker. In this case we are playing Shuck which is a particularly messed-up but high-action No Limit Hi-Lo variant of 5-card Stud. Can somebody explain the above rule to me?

Say we are three handed. If we number the cards remaining in the deck from the top down 1,2,3... The dealer prematurely burns card 1 and exposes card 2. Card 2 is now "eliminated from play" as well as cards 3 and 4? When ready to deal, we now burn card 6 and deal 7, 8 & 9. Really?

L
 

Mental Nomad

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By that rule, in your situation:

1. three-handed, pre-mature burn of #1 and show of #2. FREEZE THOSE CARDS.
2. finish the betting round, *still three-heanded*
3. the following cards are eliminated: #1, 2, 3, 4 <- these are the group of cards that would have been dealt to *three* players
4. proceed to deal normally: burn #5, deal 6, 7, 8.

The rule's purpose is to appease people concerned about the poker effects of what cards "would have come out together," and preserving the "order of the cards." Personally, I don't care, but a lot of people are very attached to what "should have been the next card." When the person with an ace in the hole sees the person to their right get dealt an ace, they're liable to say, "that should have been my ace," or such, so you can't just throw away the exposed card.

And if you throw away the exposed card and just do a new burn, "his ace" is now two people to his right. He still knows that was "his ace."

By ditching all the cards that would have been dealt together, you get away from all of these potential complaints.

I stressed the three-handedness because because it would change if one player dropped out... the person folding means that the next player would have gotten "that card," and the player after that would have had the "previous player's card." You can try to get away from all of that nonsense (which creates very real emotions at the table) by declaring dead all the cards that would be in the group, and then dealing from a fresh batch.

Here's how you deal the rule if you have one player drop out in the betting after the premature deal starts:

1. three-handed, pre-mature burn of #1 and show of #2. FREEZE THOSE CARDS.
2. finish the betting round, *one player folds, now two-handed*
3. the following cards are eliminated: #1, 2, 3 <- these are the group of cards that would have been dealt to *two* players
4. proceed to deal normally: burn #4, deal 5, 6.
 

Leonard

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Right. My example is wrong because I left out card 5, but otherwise is the right idea.
 

BGinGA

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And hang onto those unseen cards #3 and #4 on the side, in case the deck runs short later.
 
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