Cash Game Cash Game Initial Buy-Ins and Top Offs - What are People Doing? (1 Viewer)

Nine_high

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How much of a difference is there in your playing when you are sitting next to a person with a much deeper stack? How do you get “pushed around”?

I retract my question after seeing a response by @Legend5555.

Good topic/question. Thanks for sharing.
I don't, but I was talking about newer/novice players not myself. I think a lot of newer players perceive a disadvantage with a relative short stack. And I think legend is right, the real disadvantage novices have with bigger buy in caps is it will ultimately lead to bigger losses faster, which can turn them off from returning.
 

merkong

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I feel that in a tourney setting small stack v. bigger stack can create a situation where the small stack will have to consider picking a “better” spot because tourneys are about surviving. In a cash game setting, there really is no bullying because a player can simply reload.
 

NotRealNameNoSir

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I feel that in a tourney setting small stack v. bigger stack can create a situation where the small stack will have to consider picking a “better” spot because tourneys are about surviving. In a cash game setting, there really is no bullying because a player can simply reload.
You're right but many brand new players dont see it that way; they've bought in for their money and when they lose it the poker is over, the chips in front of them are it. Obviously not correct but some of my people are stuck in that mindset, cant shake it.
 

Bacon Dad

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I feel that in a tourney setting small stack v. bigger stack can create a situation where the small stack will have to consider picking a “better” spot because tourneys are about surviving. In a cash game setting, there really is no bullying because a player can simply reload.
Could you help control the variation with a closer min/max buy-in and reload? And is this really only a problem in tourney games and not cash games?

But what do you do when you all start with the same buy-in and someone has a lot of hot runs? They can accumulate a lot of chips and be sitting next to the guy who lost it to him. Should the smaller stack person move to a different table?
 

NotRealNameNoSir

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Could you help control the variation with a closer min/max buy-in and reload? And is this really only a problem in tourney games and not cash games?

But what do you do when you all start with the same buy-in and someone has a lot of hot runs? They can accumulate a lot of chips and be sitting next to the guy who lost it to him. Should the smaller stack person move to a different table?
I wouldnt say its a problem. Its two distinct variants of poker, the big and small stack dynamics are important parts of tournament poker. Think that was @merkong point: cash games dont have that tournament pressure.

In cash games, no I would absolutely not move the small stack; if I was the small stack I would WANT to be there! Win some money back! But for this reason, many home games allow people to buy in for max OR half the big stack, or match the big stack, to make sure people aren't too behind.
 

Taxi500

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I'm running a bi-weekly .25c/.50c cash game with friends. We do minimum buy in $50 max initial buy in $100 with unlimited top offs. I think it helps keep people in check. The whole "Big stack bullying" concern has not come to fruition and I think it's more fun!
 
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