60” Round Table Build

DoubleEagle

Full House
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
4,241
Reaction score
5,952
Location
Salina, KS
Building a 60” round table for a client. Here are the specs:

60” round
6” rail
Jumbo cup holders in the rail
1/4” Volara playing surface padding
Royal blue mini-suited speedcloth
Oak pedestal

Unfortunately, there is no 60“ Baltic Birch available in my area so I need to build up the 60“ surface by extending the side of the 4‘x 8‘ plywood sheets from 48“ to 60”. I need three 60” x 60“ sheets. Step 1 is to cut three sheets of birch plywood down to 60” x 48”. I use birch as it is much flatter than the standard AC or BC plywood at Lowes or Menards. AC and BC always seems to be bowed and warped.

I cut the plywood in my garage as it is much easier to move the smaller pieces down into my basement shop.

7319C922-FBC0-4A6E-81DB-B469A7E65A39.jpeg
6DF17E70-E988-42F5-9CE2-3F6432398A9B.jpeg


Next, cut three 12” x 48” pieces from the scrap plywood.

Then take each 12” x 48” piece and attach to the sides of the 48” x 60” pieces. This can be done one of two ways. I used to use biscuits and glue, then clamping the two pieces together. This time I am using pocket hole screws with glue. Not sure one is better than the other, just different.

E425DDC0-11D8-4191-B86B-132AE944A196.jpeg
4DC12A94-D332-4524-A9A3-70D88820D01D.jpeg


The next step was to cut each of the glued up plywood sheets into a perfectly round 60“ circle. I do that with a router attached to a Lewin circle cutting jig with the Lewin extension. I have two routers and leave one attached to the Lewin jig all the time so I don’t need to take it on and off the router.

8A92D2DB-B97E-478C-9275-96104C35D6E6.jpeg
B357A647-771A-4734-B682-274F97E9C9A7.jpeg



Next, I cut 1 1/2” from one of the round sheets. This will be the rail lip. The remainder will become the top sheet of the table.

A2BEA6C6-4492-4371-91AB-64D9831CA8CC.jpeg


The next step is to cut the 6” rail from one the remaining 60“ sheets.

C6FF894B-1197-4849-994B-C70BCCDE3AE9.jpeg


Below is a pic of the rail lip sitting on the rail. This is just for illustration as I still need to cut spacers to attach between the the rail and the rail lip.

DA9A2D08-A536-4856-B494-218B46466E26.jpeg


That’s all for today. Next is to cut the spacers and glue and screw the rail and rail lip together.

More to come...
 
Last edited:

StatTracker

Two Pair
Joined
Apr 17, 2020
Messages
386
Reaction score
237
Location
Los Angeles
Jumbo stainless cup holders. Rail will be 2 1/4” plus the thickness of the compressed 1” high density rail foam.
I couldn't find any info about implementing cupholders online. What point in the build will you be drilling the holes? I liked drilling after upholstery more than right before upholstery but it left a huge mess.
 

DoubleEagle

Full House
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
4,241
Reaction score
5,952
Location
Salina, KS
Will cut the cup holder cutouts after glueing up the rail pieces. The cutouts will extend through the rail and through the top sheet.
 

kalimba

Waiting List
Joined
Sep 16, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
29
Location
Los Angeles, CA, USA
First of all, great work so far. Can't wait to see the remaining steps.

Secondly, regarding biscuits vs. pocket screws when assembling individual pieces to form the top: if you take the pocket screw route, when you are positioning the pockets you have to keep in mind where you are planning to later cut into the top. If you don't plan accordingly, you could run your router bit right into a screw when cutting.

I'm assuming that you already know this, based on your flawless execution; it's more of an FYI for anyone else considering using the pocket screw technique in their own table build.
 

DoubleEagle

Full House
Supporting Member
Joined
Jul 7, 2015
Messages
4,241
Reaction score
5,952
Location
Salina, KS
First of all, great work so far. Can't wait to see the remaining steps.

Secondly, regarding biscuits vs. pocket screws when assembling individual pieces to form the top: if you take the pocket screw route, when you are positioning the pockets you have to keep in mind where you are planning to later cut into the top. If you don't plan accordingly, you could run your router bit right into a screw when cutting.

I'm assuming that you already know this, based on your flawless execution; it's more of an FYI for anyone else considering using the pocket screw technique in their own table build.
Thank you. I need to finish things up this weekend.

I probably won't go the pocket screw route again. I couldn't figure out a way to clamp the two boards together to make them flat when screwing them together with the pocket screws. I had to use my belt sander to smooth the joint flat.
 

Rebelwork

Two Pair
Joined
Dec 2, 2018
Messages
446
Reaction score
288
Location
Odessa,Mo
You can use the pocket screws. As long as the joint was good to start you can use the screws till it is dry and pull the screws out..

Normally I just use pipe or bar clamps
 
Last edited:

Venturalvn

Flush
Joined
May 26, 2017
Messages
1,512
Reaction score
2,871
Location
Simi Valley, CA
Top Bottom