6.4 Million dollar chip order (1 Viewer)

Tommy

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900,000 chips
137,000 plaques

= 6.4 million dollars?

LAS VEGAS, May 23, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Gaming Partners International Corporation (NASDAQ: GPIC), a leading provider of casino currency and table game products worldwide, announced today that it received a significant order to supply new chips and plaques for a casino in Macau. The order includes nearly 900,000 chips and over 137,000 plaques from the Company's Bourgogne et Grasset and Bud Jones brands totaling just under $6.4 million.
 

spikeithard

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Heavy ammo!

Think if we added up everyone's chips on this site it would be less or more than that order?
I'm taking under but not by too much

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ChipEnvy

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Not sure how that gorilla math works out... They must be missing a zero somewhere.

It's always some mundane detail.
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200 Motels

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he order includes nearly 900,000 chips and over 137,000 plaques from the Company's Bourgogne et Grasset and Bud Jones brands totaling just under $6.4 million.

The order very likely includes tables and other equipment. It's for a new casino isn't it? Also the Bourgogne et Grasset and Bud Jones means not a clay chip in the casino. :(
 

BGinGA

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The order includes nearly 900,000 chips and over 137,000 plaques

$2/chip and $20/plaque works out to 4.54 million. I'm guessing those numbers are high (but probably not by much), and that the order also includes associated items like racks, carriers, storage cabinets, ultraviolet and RFID readers, and possibly gaming tables and associated items. Maybe even a chip-cleaning machine. :)

6.4 million seems (gulp) reasonable.
 

200 Motels

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$2/chip and $20/plaque works out to 4.54 million. I'm guessing those numbers are high (but probably not by much), and that the order also includes associated items like racks, carriers, storage cabinets, ultraviolet and RFID readers, and possibly gaming tables and associated items. Maybe even a chip-cleaning machine. :)

6.4 million seems (gulp) reasonable.

Serious question. What would a small casino in the US pay per chip for BJs. Say 200,000 chips? Same question but for Paulsons. Just the chips. $2 / chip seems like a lot.
 

BGinGA

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Serious question. What would a small casino in the US pay per chip for BJs. Say 200,000 chips? Same question but for Paulsons. Just the chips. $2 / chip seems like a lot.

High-end and tech-savvy security features don't come cheap. Part of the reason that GPI shut down the home market was to eliminate the cheaper-end chip market from driving lower price expectations from their casino customers.

Also why a lot of smaller casinos don't use GPI, and instead opt for cheaper ABS or ceramic chips.
 

Mental Nomad

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The casinos pay $2 or more. They don't get as much of a volume discount as most people think, and they are generally buying high end chips with security features.

I think BG is on the money-they're buying a lot more than just chips. A new casino will need chips, racks, carriers, tables, dealer trays, drop boxes, carts, scanners, counters, cards, dice, layouts, Pai Gow tiles, wheels for big six and roulette, balls, lammers, card shoes, shuffle machines, chip mucking machines, digital displays for jackpots, jackpot chip drops, and they may be buying the versions of everything with rfid readers - from trays to cage counters - and possibly integrating it with a centralized chip inventory system.
 

ovo

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But I thought casino's don't lose money if you take a rack of chips, meaning they cost less than a dollar per chip ??? And why they don't want to let the fracs go
 

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People have a very false impression that casinos get a big discount on chips. They do not. That's a big part of why Paulson doesn't sell to consumers, any more... we were getting very, very low prices. The casinos wanted to pay less than consumers, but then there's just no profit in the chips. Paulson could either start charging consumers $4 a chip, or stop selling. At that price, there's no real difference in the outcome!

Casinos do lose money if you take a rack of $1 checks. They don't lose money if you take a rack of $5 checks. They dance with joy if you run off with $25s or $100s.

They lose the most money on fracs... because even a plain, no-spot hot-stamped solid costs a lot more than the $0.25 cash value for which you might take it.

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"Chip mucking machine"?

Called a chipper. Used in roulette to sort chips.

Right; mucking is actually the technical term (or at least the trade jargon) for sorting chips. In roulette, the main dealer is called a "croupier," and needs specific training. The secondary person is a mucker, whose job is to sort chips into clean stacks. Anyone with a dealer's license can muck chips. At a busy roulette table, you need someone mucking full-time if the croupier is to have a chance of keeping the game moving. Ideally, it's someone really good at mucking, who is also a croupier (can help prep big payouts and double-check calculations. etc.)

I closed out many a graveyard shift mucking chips after the action died down at the card tables. I was a dumb mucker - roulette was no one of my games.

The machines in use back when I was dealing (a long time ago) weren't that much faster than people, but the fact that you can immediately dump all the chips into the hopper cleared the felt quickly, which allowed the croupier to more easily and quickly work the payouts - which is well worth the machine, even if you have a mucker stand around just to put up the stacks the machine makes.
 

Ronoh

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In roulette, the main dealer is called a "croupier," and needs specific training. The secondary person is a mucker, whose job is to sort chips into clean stacks. Anyone with a dealer's license can muck chips. At a busy roulette table, you need someone mucking full-time if the croupier is to have a chance of keeping the game moving. Ideally, it's someone really good at mucking, who is also a croupier (can help prep big payouts and double-check calculations. etc.)
I always loved dealing a busy wheel back when I dealt ("busy" = 400 to 600 chips on the layout per spin) and we never had chippers or a 2nd dealer mucking the game. I could get out 80% of the SPH of most dealers only facing outside wagers, I was pretty damn quick.

Absolutely the best game to deal... when you're tapped out after an hour long shift you feel like you've only been on the game for 15 minutes ;)
 

TheDeezer

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BUD JONES chips too.... not a fan . I think the ones at Borgata could be the worse to shuffle and stack for that matter.... bummer... still that's a stout order.
 

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I always loved dealing a busy wheel back when I dealt ("busy" = 400 to 600 chips on the layout per spin) and we never had chippers or a 2nd dealer mucking the game. I could get out 80% of the SPH of most dealers only facing outside wagers, I was pretty damn quick.

Absolutely the best game to deal... when you're tapped out after an hour long shift you feel like you've only been on the game for 15 minutes ;)

Nice. I never trained on Roulette, but I was a good mucker - big, fast hands, and I used to hit the chips like it was a speed challenge. I'd even strategize what colors to pull first in order to maximize visibility on the next pass. That - and the fact they they knew I was also a full-time college student - always ensured that if my graveyard shift was ending early because the tables were slow, I'd always be offered the chance to finish my eight hours mucking. Every shift ended quickly for me, unless I was idle.
 
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